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Animal health services at work in Ethiopia

Evidence from Ada’a and Sululta districts










FAO. 2021. Animal health services at work in Ethiopia – Evidence from Ada’a and Sululta districts. Africa Sustainable Livestock 2050. Rome.




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    Animal health services at work in Uganda
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    Frontline animal health officers are mandated to support the enforcement of laws and good practices along the livestock value chain. However, there's little systematic information on the way they operate on the ground, including on the constraints and challenges they face and the rules and procedures they follow when performing their duties. The FAO and the government of Uganda joined forces to fill this information gap and conducted a survey on a complete enumeration basis of fronline animal health officers operating in Mukono and Wakiso Districts. Results of the survey point to both institutional and procedural bottlenecks that prevent animal health officers to efficiently delivery their services on the ground, such as lack of any transport allowance, little knowledge of the existing animal health laws and regulations and unclear rules for career progression. Small investments could often suffice to address many of the identified bottlenecks.
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    Policy brief
    Africa Sustainable Livestock 2050: Awareness of livestock sector policies, laws and One Health among local animal health staff
    Snapshot from a survey in six sub-regions in Ethiopia, Kenya and Uganda
    2022
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    Livestock sector and One Health-related policies and laws provide the overarching framework that guides the development and transformation of the livestock sector. Local authorities, and in particular frontline animal health officers, are responsible for their implementation. To perform their function properly, frontline animal health officers should not only be technically competent but also adequately knowledgeable about these policies and laws. We interviewed 209 frontline animal health officers about their working modalities and livestock sector relevant policy and law awareness in two largely urban and peri-urban sub-regions of each Ethiopia, Kenya and Uganda, not far from the capital cities. On average, 60 percent of officers could quote at least one livestock law and 44 percent have heard of the One Health approach. There were great differences between countries, awareness on policies, laws and One Health were lowest in Ethiopia, followed by Kenya and highest in Uganda. We also found that in Ethiopia, Kenya and Uganda 22, 14 and 4 percent of officers have never recieved any training since they started working. A Poisson model shows that participating in trainings is associated with an increase in the number of policies or laws and officer can quote. A logit model suggests that participating in trainings increases the odds of an officer having heard of One Health.
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    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    Animal health services at work in Kenya
    Evidence from Kiambu and Nairobi City Counties
    2021
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    Animal health policies and strategies are, in most countries, comprehensive and well-designed but poorly implemented. One of the reasons is that there is little systematic information on the challenges and constraints policy implementers face, which makes it difficult the design of actionable policy implementation mechanisms. This report explores the functioning of public animal health services in two local governments of Kenya – Kiambu county and Nairobi City county – which are in charge of implementing the animal health policy and legislative framework at local level. Results suggest that animal health services are greatly understaffed and underresourced, and that the working environment of frontline health officers is not conducive in terms of personal incentives, working procedures and knowledge of the prevailing policy and legislative framework as well as of emerging animal health issues. While more resources should be allocated to public animal health services, local administrations could already establish partnerships with private actors and improve the working environment of animal health officers to make veterinary services more effective.

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