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Plan of Action for North Sudan. Emergency response and rehabilitation for food and agriculture August 2010 – August 2012








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    Plan of Action for Southern Sudan. Emergency response and rehabilitation for food and agriculture August 2010 – August 2012 2010
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    Food insecurity and poverty are widespread across Southern Sudan, linked to decades of civil conflict, the disruption and loss of economic activities, displacement of a significant portion of the population, lack of basic infrastructure and the erosion of livelihood options. Southern Sudan faces one of the worst humanitarian and food-security situations in the world, with at least 1.5 million people relying on external assistance to meet their food needs. Traditional livelihood systems are root ed in the agriculture sector, employing a mix of livestock and crop production, fishing, wild food collection and trade. With about 80 percent of the population relying on agricultural production to meet their food and income needs, the role of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) – the United Nations agency with the mandate for agriculture and rural development – is critical in strengthening the agriculture sector and contributing to wider peacebuilding efforts. In this Plan of Action (PoA), the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) outlines its emergency and rehabilitation programme for Southern Sudan in 2010–12. It does not include FAO’s long-term development programme, but is designed to complement the Organization’s ongoing development activities, as well as the interventions of United Nations agencies, Government and other partners which aim to mitigate the effects of recurrent crises while addressing their root causes. The ov erall purpose of the PoA is to improve preparedness and to make short-term responses in food and agriculture more effective. The programme relies heavily on a disaster risk management approach to the complex situation in Southern Sudan. This approach focuses on emergency relief, such as replacing lost assets or restoring livelihoods, as well as on early efforts as part of risk reduction that protect and sustain livelihoods. Such interventions can often be more effective than those delayed until people are in crisis. Given the complex and protracted nature of the crisis in Southern Sudan, FAO’s relief and recovery programming is enhanced by interventions that not only restore, but also protect and promote livelihoods in food and agriculture. The proposed priorities in this PoA will help FAO, its counterparts and partners to meet short-term needs in ways that strengthen the resilience of communities and lead to more effective and longer-term recovery. The three key areas of focus propose d in this PoA are based on an analysis of the current situation and of the main factors triggering food insecurity and assessments identifying and targeting vulnerable groups. These are: (i) improving food production; (ii) improving food accessibility; and (iii) improving agricultural productivity. These priorities have been expanded into fourteen sectoral programmes that detail the activities to be implemented by FAO in Southern Sudan to achieve the expected outcomes and address the specific ne eds identified in the five priority states of Eastern Equatoria, Jonglei, Northern Bahr el-Ghazal, Upper Nile and Warrap. The total budget for the PoA 2010–12 is USD 67 821 864.
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    Africa Report - No. 2 September 2005 2005
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    Eastern Africa: Prospects for the 2005 main season cereal crops have improved in some major producing areas of the subregion due to favourable rains. The overall food situation, however, remains precarious with high malnutrition rates reported in several countries in the subregion due to the effects of war, displacement and earlier droughts. Currently, more than 18 million people in the subregion depend on humanitarian assistance. The situation in Sudan is particularly alarming due to con tinued conflict that has resulted in a serious food situation, especially in Darfur and southern Sudan. In Somalia, recent assessments indicate severe food insecurity in several parts of the country. Below average 2005 main “gu” season harvest in southern Somalia coupled with an upsurge in civil strife have exacerbated the situation. Nearly one million people are in need of humanitarian assistance. Recent food aid pledges for Eritrea and Ethiopia have boosted the food aid pipeline, but deliv eries need to be accelerated. Southern Africa: About 12 million people in the subregion, two-thirds of them in Zimbabwe and Malawi, are in need of emergency food assistance in the current marketing year. The situation is expected to worsen during the lean months until the next harvest in April-May, unless international relief is provided urgently. Most countries of the subregion including Zimbabwe, Botswana, Malawi, Namibia, Lesotho, Zambia and Swaziland have gathered below average main s eason cereal harvests in 2005. In Zimbabwe, high inflation coupled with shortages of maize grain and fuel as well as transport problems are causing serious food insecurity. For the same reasons, prospects for 2006 are dire, regardless of rainfall. In Malawi, about 4.6 million vulnerable people are facing severe food shortages and require an estimated 414 000 tonnes of cereals in emergency assistance. Current high maize prices are exacerbating the situation. Above average cereal harvests ha ve been estimated for South Africa, Angola, Mozambique and Madagascar. South Africa’s record maize harvest of 12.4 million tonnes is estimated to result in an exportable surplus of about 5 million tonnes, more than enough to cover the subregion’s import requirements. WFP’s regional Protracted Relief and Recovery Operation has so far received only 30 percent of the 704 000 tonnes requirement over a three-year period (2005-07). Western Africa: The Sahel and northern parts of coastal countrie s continue to face a difficult lean season, due to depleted household food stocks and unusually high food prices. However, current season crop development in the Sahel has been satisfactory so far in main producing zones, due to favourable growing conditions. In Niger, the food situation remains critical, and WFP has expanded its emergency operation to assist 2.5 million people until the end of the lean season in October. In Côte d’Ivoire, insecurity, labour shortages and the de facto partit ion of the country continue to disrupt agricultural production and marketing activities. In Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone, food assistance continues to be needed for internally displaced people and refugees. Central Africa: Cereal harvests of the main season (2005B) were favourable in Rwanda and Burundi with improvements in the order of 33 percent and 7 percent above the five-year averages in the two countries, respectively. Food insecurity persists in the violence-prone eastern part of DRC and in pockets of chronically vulnerable districts in Burundi and Rwanda.
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    Plan of action for Malawi 2012-2016 2012
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    The Republic of Malawi is among the poorest countries in the world. The country is frequently hit by disasters, with many people affected by shocks such as dry spells, flooding, crop and livestock diseases, high input prices, and unstable markets. These often result in the loss of lives, assets and support systems. According to the Malawi National Disaster Risk Management Policy document, the intensity and frequency of disasters has been increasing, in large part owing to climate change, population growth, urbanization and environmental degradation. The recurrence of rapid and slow-onset disasters in areas such as the Lower Shire makes recovery progressively more difficult for communities whose livelihoods are already weakened by poverty and other underlying socio-economic constraints. Although – for over five years – Malawi has been producing surplus staple food, some communities remain food and nutrition insecure owing to the impacts of various shocks. In addition, most smallholder farmers are yet to generate meaningful incomes from farming. This is in part due to the narrow range of enterprises they pursue, low productivity levels and poor market access. There is an urgent need to address vulnerability and disaster threats and impacts in Malawi, taking into account the underlying challenges faced by the affected and at-risk communities. A more coordinated and holistic approach is required to help them transition from emergency and relief assistanc e to longer-term development. The Government of Malawi, with support from development and other partners, is focusing on socio-economic development through strategies that include supporting the increased performance of the agriculture sector. The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) is a key partner in Malawi’s growth and development objectives. As part of its Strategic Framework 2010–2019, FAO aims to strengthen disaster preparedness and improve linkages and transitions between emergency, rehabilitation and development. FAO uses the Plan of Action (PoA) as a tool to promote more integrated planning and coordination, and to guide a smooth transition from relief to development in disaster-prone and -affected countries. The current document provides details of the proposed PoA for Malawi. It describes FAO’s strategy to “bridge” emergency interventions to more medium- and long-term national development priorities and programmes for the next five years (2012–2016) in support of the Government and in partnership with key stakeholders.

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