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Enhanced drought tolerance by expression of hvDhn5 gene in poplar

XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022









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    Wood transcriptome profiling identifies critical pathway genes of secondary wall biosynthesis and novel regulators for vascular cambium development in populus
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
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    Wood, the most abundant biomass on Earth, is composed of secondary xylem differentiated from vascular cambium. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms of wood formation remain largely unclear. To gain insight into wood formation, we performed a series of wood-forming tissue-specific transcriptome analyses from a hybrid poplar (Populus alba × P. glandulosa, clone BH) using RNA-seq. Together with shoot apex and leaf tissue, cambium and xylem tissues were isolated from vertical stem segments representing a gradient of secondary growth developmental stages (i.e., immature, intermediate, and mature stem). In a comparative transcriptome analysis of the ‘developing xylem’ and ‘leaf’ tissue, we could identify critical players catalyzing each biosynthetic step of secondary wall components (e.g., cellulose, xylan, and lignin). Several candidate genes involved in the initiation of vascular cambium formation were found via a co-expression network analysis using abundantly expressed genes in the ‘intermediate stem-derived cambium’ tissue. We found that transgenic Arabidopsis plants overexpressing the PtrHAM4-1, a GRAS family transcription factor, resulted in a significant increase of vascular cambium development. This phenotype was successfully reproduced in the transgenic poplars overexpressing the PtrHAM4-1. Taken together, our results may serve as a springboard for further research to unravel the molecular mechanism of wood formation, one of the most important biological processes on this planet. Keywords: Genetic resources, Research ID: 3622616
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    Growth and physiological acclimation to shade in young plants of Adesmia bijuga Phil., critically endangered species in central Chile
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
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    Adesmia bijuga Phil. is an endemic and endangered shrub species of central Chile. Its potential shade intolerance is one of the leading hypotheses for its vigor loss when the species grows beneath closed canopies. In this study we aimed to assess growth and physiological acclimation to shade in young of A. bijuga plants. A nursery experiment was established with three light levels based on the interception of photosynthetic active radiation (PAR) (TRT0: control at full sun, TRT60: 60% shaded, and TRT90: 90% shaded), and maintained for 71 days during the summer season. Growth and leaf morpho-physiological responses were evaluated at the beginning, at the middle, and at the end of the experiment. The shading treatment increased plant height (H) and live crown percentage (Lcrown) compared to the control treatment at full sun. However, light-saturated photosynthetic rate (Amax), dark respiration rate (Rd), and light compensation point (Gi) were higher in TRT60 than in the other treatments.No differences were found among treatments for the apparent quantum yield (α). At this stage of plant development, our results suggest high acclimation plasticity of A. bijuga to light levels; however, a semi-shade environment (i.e., TRT60) favored a better performance of the species. Keywords: Shade tolerance, photosynthesis, light acclimation, forest restoration. ID: 3624055
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    Sucrose, photosynthetic photon flux density, & CO2 concentration affect growth & development of micropropagated mountain ash
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
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    Mountain ash (Sorbus commixta Hedl.), is an important medicinal woody plant in Korea used for the treatment of cough, asthma, and other bronchial disorders. Unfortunately, the species is gradually disappearing due to over exploitation of the natural habitats. Tissue culture is a common and powerful technique for the clonal mass propagation which can be adapted to Mountain ash for ecosystem restoration. In an effort to establish a micropropagation method at the stage II for proliferation of shoots, Mountain ash was micropropagated under the so called a photo-autotrophic or photo-mixotrophic culture conditions. Micro-shoots of Mountain ash at the micropropagation stage II were cultured under two levels each of medium sucrose concentration (0 and 30 g.L-1), photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD, 50 and 200 µmol.m-2.s-1), and CO2 concentration (350 and 1,000 µmol.mol-1). Axillary shoots originated from in vitro-grown plantlets, were stuck into and cultured on 50 ml per container of agar-solidified half-strength Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium with 2.0 mg.L-1 indole-3-butyric acid (IBA). Tissue water content, leaf length, and total chlorophyll content increased in plantlets cultured in the medium without sucrose (a photo-autotrophic condition). High PPFD promoted axillary shoot length, number of nodes, axillary shoot fresh weight, axillary shoot dry weight, leaf length, leaf width, and total chlorophyll content especially in the photo-autotrophic condition. High CO2 concentration increased axillary shoot length, number of axillary shoots, number of nodes, stem diameter, axillary shoot fresh weight, and axillary shoot dry weight. The treatment with a high PPFD, a high CO2 concentration, and without supplementation of sucrose to the medium (a photo-autotrophic condition) was better for growth and development in terms of number of nodes, tissue water content, leaf length, leaf width, and total chlorophyll content than those in the other treatments. Keywords: Research, Biodiversity conservation ID: 3622923

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