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Sixth World Congress on Seafood Safety, Quality and Trade. Sydney, Australia, 14–16 September 2005.










James, D.; Ababouch, L. (eds). Sixth World Congress on Seafood Safety, Quality and Trade. Sydney, Australia, 14–16 September 2005. FAO Fisheries Proceedings. No. 7. Rome, FAO. 2007. 206p.


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    These proceedings contain the manuscripts from the Second International Congress on Seafood Technology on Sustainable, Innovative and Healthy Seafood held in Anchorage, the United States of America from 10 to 13 May 2010. The University of Alaska organized the meeting in collaboration with the FAO Fisheries and Aquaculture Department.The congress reviewed developments related to:international seafood trade;consumer trends, consumption and health benefits;regulations for market access in internat ional trade;recent trends in certification in the seafood sector;value-added products and new technologies;packaging;seafood quality and safety; education at college/university level;economics; andfishmeal and fish oil.The meeting included a range of views regarding the opportunities and the recent developments in sustainable, innovative and healthy seafood. These included thoughts from government officials, business representatives and academia and highlighted that the seafood industry is in a position to take advantage of the many positive aspects that consumption of seafood offers to consumers, while recognizing that there are still challenges ahead to realize fully the potential that seafood can achieve in international and national trade and in meeting consumer expectations.
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    Seventy percent of the world's catch of fish and fishery products is consumed as food. Fish and shellfish products represent 15.6 percent of animal protein supply and 5.6 percent of total protein supply on a worldwide basis. Developing countries account for almost 50 percent of global fish exports. Seafood-borne disease or illness outbreaks affect consumers both physically and financially, and create regulatory problems for both importing and exporting countries. Seafood safety as a commodity ca nnot be purchased in the marketplace and government intervenes to regulate the safety and quality of seafood. Theoretical issues and data limitations create problems in estimating what consumers will pay for seafood safety and quality. The costs and benefits of seafood safety must be considered at all levels, including the fishers, fish farmers, input suppliers to fishing, processing and trade, seafood processors, seafood distributors, consumers and government. Hazard Analysis Critical Control P oint (HACCP) programmes are being implemented on a worldwide basis for seafood. Studies have been completed to estimate the cost of HACCP in various shrimp, fish and shellfish plants in the United States, and are underway for some seafood plants in the United Kingdom, Canada and Africa. Major developments within the last two decades have created a set of complex trading situations for seafood. Current events indicate that seafood safety and quality can be used as non-tariff barriers to free trad e. Research priorities necessary to estimate the economic value and impacts of achieving safer seafood are outlined at the consumer, seafood production and processing, trade and government levels. An extensive list of references on the economics of seafood safety and quality is presented.
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    The importance of securing a safe and wholesome food supply is receiving more attention than ever before. Although the fish industry has been at the forefront of implementing food quality and safety regulations and programmes, the availability and harmonization of scientific information related to the safety and quality of fishery products require improvement. And with increasing demands and higher standards facing the food industry, there is a growing need for special programmes to help developing countries implement new international instruments. This document presents the proceedings of the Fifth World Fish Inspection and Quality Control Congress held in October 2003. The issues discussed and outcomes point to a strong commitment by the international community to harmonize food control systems in order to facilitate global and responsible trade and assist member countries in developing national capacity to deal with this fast-changing area.

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