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Report of the FAO Expert Consultation on the Use of Irrigation Systems for Sustainable Fish Production in Arid Countries of Asia. Almaty, Kazakhstan, 25-29 September 2001











Petr, T.; Marmulla, G. Report of the FAO Expert Consultation on the Use of Irrigation Systems for Sustainable Fish Production in Arid Countries of Asia. Almaty, Kazakhstan, 25-29 September 2001. FAO Fisheries Report. No. 679. Rome, FAO. 2002. 22p.


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    This Fisheries Technical Paper is a companion to the Report of the FAO Expert Consultation on the Use of Irrigation Systems for Sustainable Fish Production in Arid Countries of Asia (FAO Fisheries Report No. 679). The consultation was held at Almaty, Kazakhstan, from 25 to 29 September 2001. The document brings together twelve papers that review the present use of irrigation systems for fisheries in the countries of the arid belt of Asia, from Turkey to China. The individual papers deal with the following countries and areas: Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region (China), India, the Islamic Republic of Iran, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Mongolia, Pakistan, Turkey and Uzbekistan. While some countries in the arid belt are well advanced in the field of fish production from waterbodies of irrigation systems, others are experiencing major difficulties arising from recent changes in their political and economic systems, particularly Mongolia and the countries of Central Asia. Such co untries require major assistance. The document includes a summary of recommendations and proposals for further action, as formulated by the expert consultation.
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    Agricultural Drainage Water Management in Arid and Semi-Arid Areas 2002
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    This publication provides planners, decision-makers and engineers with guidelines to sustain irrigated agriculture and at the same time to protect water resources from the negative impacts of agricultural drainage water disposal. On the basis of case studies from Central Asia, Egypt, India, Pakistan and the United States of America, it distinguishes four broad groups of drainage water management: water conservation, drainage water reuse, drainage water disposal and drainage water treatment. All these options have certain potential impacts on the hydrology and water quality in an area, with interactions and trade-offs occurring when more than one is applied. This publication presents a framework to help make a selection from among the various drainage water management options and to evaluate their impact and contribution towards development goals. In addition, it presents technical background and guidelines on each of the options to enable improved assessment of their impacts and to fac ilitate the preparation of drainage water management plans and designs.
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    Aquaculture in desert and arid lands: development constraints and opportunities. FAO Technical Workshop. 6-9 July 2010, Hermosillo, Mexico 2011
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    Aquaculture in desert and arid lands has been growing steadily over the last decade thanks to the modern technologies and alternative energy sources that have allowed water in these places of extremes to be exploited more effectively and more efficiently, using it for both crop irrigation and production of fish. This publication presents the evolution of desert and arid lands aquaculture in the past few decades in seven countries and regions (Australia, Egypt, Israel, Mexico, Southern Africa, the United States of America and Central Asia) describing the achievements of a number of farming operations, which demonstrate the significant potential for farming commercial aquatic organisms using geothermal, fresh and brackish waters. The global overview on desert aquaculture development shows, through the use of maps and tables, those countries with vast extensions of arid territories that should be better investigated for potential aquaculture development. Limiting f actors were extensively discussed during the workshop, and several measures were identified and proposed. Desert conditions are characterized by high day temperatures, cold winter nights, high solar radiation, scarce precipitation and very low relative humidity. The experts reached consensus on the definition of aquaculture in the desert and arid lands, which was defined as follows: “Aquaculture activities practised in desert and arid lands characterized by low precipitation (<250 mm/y ear), high solar radiation, high rate of evaporation, using subsurface and surface water”. At the end of the workshop, a series of recommendations were elaborated by the experts to assist FAO Member countries wishing to generate a favourable national environment to promote sustainable aquaculture development. Limited water supply remains the single largest constraint for aquaculture development in arid and semi-arid regions; however, where the resource is available, the development of integrated aqua-agriculture systems may certainly provide economic output opportunities from such resource-limited regions. Such farming systems may also enable the production of highly priced fish, vegetables and fruits all year round.

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