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Tilapia Lake Virus (TiLV)

Expert Knowledge Elicitation (EKE) Risk Assessment












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    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    Enhancing national and regional capacities to deal with Tilapia lake virus 2019
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    Tilapia lake virus (TiLV) is a recently described disease affecting wild and farmed tilapines. Tilapias are farmed globally and are the second most important aquaculture species in terms of volumes produced, providing a key source of affordable animal protein, income to fish farmers and fishers, and domestic and export earnings. Infection with TiLV has caused extremely variable mortalities (ranging from 0 to 90 percent ) and may pose a great threat to the tilapia sector. The virus was first recognized in Israel in 2011 and was assumed to be linked to previously unexplained outbreaks in Israel in 2009. At present, it has been reported in three continents (Asia, Africa and South America) and the number of countries where the agent has been detected is likely to increase rapidly as a result of increased awareness, surveillance and availability of diagnostic methods. While there is no public health concern for this pathogen, there is a significant risk of TiLV being translocated both inter- and intra-continentally through the movement of infected live tilapias in the absence of appropriate biosecurity measures. FAO monitors TiLV, provides technical assistance and works with FAO member governments and their constituents as well as development partners and searches for resources to support the tilapia sector and the communities dependent on it.
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    Newsletter
    FAO/GIEWS - Special Alert No. 338 2017
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    Tilapia lake virus (TiLV) poses a great threat to the tilapia sector. Tilapias are farmed globally and are the second most important aquaculture species in terms of volumes produced, providing a key source of affordable animal protein, income to fishfarmers and fishers, and domestic and export earnings. TiLV has been confirmed in some countries in Asia, Africa and Latin America. It is likely that TiLV may have a wider distribution than is known today and its threat to tilapia farming at the gl obal level is significant. While there is no public health concern for this pathogen, there is a significant risk of TiLV being translocated both inter- and intra-continentally through the movement of infected live tilapias in the absence of appropriate biosecurity measures. Tilapia producing countries need to be vigilant and take appropriate risk management measures (e.g. enhanced diagnostic testing of imported stocks and unexplained tilapia mortalities and reporting to biosecurity authoriti es, active surveillance, public information campaigns and contingency plans) to reduce the further spread and potential socio-economic impacts of this emerging disease.
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    Book (series)
    Tilapia lake virus disease strategy manual 2021
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    The purpose of this manual is to inform national policymakers and other stakeholders of issues related to the development of contingency plans for responding to outbreaks of tilapia lake virus disease (TiLVD), which has caused substantial mortalities, up to 90 percent, in populations of both wild and farmed tilapia in Asia, the Americas, and Africa. The causative agent for this disease is tilapia lake virus (TiLV), which infects the liver, spleen, kidney, heart, gill tissues, brain, connective tissues of muscle, and reproductive organs of tilapia. Outbreaks of TiLVD not only have devastating economic effects on producers, but also can result in a variety of socio-economic impacts on surrounding communities. It would, therefore, be prudent to implement strategies for the prevention of TiLVD and to develop contingency plans to eradicate, contain, and mitigate the impacts of the disease when outbreaks occur. This manual provides information on: 1) the nature of TiLVD; 2) diagnosis; 3) prevention and control; 4) epidemiology; 5) principles of eradication, containment and mitigation; and 6) policy development issues.

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