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Conversion factors for processed queen conch to nominal weight/ Factores de conversión para el caracol reina procesado a peso nominal










Aspra, B.; Barnutty, R.; Mateo, J.; Marttin. F.; Scalisi, M. Conversion factors for processed queen conch to nominal weight/Factores de conversión para el caracol reina procesado a peso nominal. FAO Fisheries and Aquaculture Circular/FAO, Circular de Pesca y Acuicultura. No. 1042. Rome/Roma, FAO. 2009. 97p.


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    Manual for the monitoring and management of queen conch 2005
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    The Caribbean queen conch Strombus gigas is listed on Appendix II of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES). A listing on Appendix II requires that any specimen of the species included in Appendix II can only be exported if a permit has been issued to allow the export. Further, CITES states that export permits should only be issued when the responsible authority has deemed that the export will not be detrimental to the survival of that species . This manual presents guidelines on the requirements for responsible management of the fisheries exploiting queen conch, with particular emphasis on the requirements to comply with the relevant CITES regulations. The manual describes the basic fisheries management cycle which includes: development and interpretation of policy; the need for management controls to regulate fishing activities; data collection and analysis; decision-making; enforcement of and compliance with the management controls ; and regular feedback and review of the management system. It provides general guidance on each of those steps for the queen conch fisheries of the Caribbean. It also provides two case studies of management systems currently being applied: the Turks and Caicos Islands and Jamaica.
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    Report of the Regional Workshop on the Monitoring and Management of Queen Conch, Strombus gigas. Kingston, Jamaica, 1–5 May 2006. 2007
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    This document contains the report of the Regional Workshop on the Monitoring and Management of Queen Conch, Strombus gigas, held in Kingston, Jamaica, from 1 to 5 May 2006. The purpose of the workshop was to assist Caribbean countries in the development of effective management plans for queen conch fisheries and, consequently, to improve their capacity to implement regulations and obligations under the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CIT ES) and the Protocol Concerning Specially Protected Areas and Wildlife (SPAW) of the regional Convention for the Protection and Development of the Marine Environment of the Wider Caribbean Region (Cartagena Convention). The workshop addressed issues related to: policies and legislation; management objectives, indicators and reference points; management controls; and enforcement and compliance. These issues were addressed at the national level, through the preparation of Draft Fisheri es Management Plans by the participating countries, and at regional level through working groups formed during the workshop. Results from the workshop led to recommendations aimed at improving queen conch fisheries management at national and regional level.
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    Desarrollo de un criadero regional de especies nativas de mariscosh to nominal weight/ Factores de conversión para el caracol reina procesado a peso nominal 2011
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    It is widely recognized that the development of aquaculture in the Wider Caribbean region is inhibited, in part, by the lack of technical expertise, infrastructure, capital investment and human resources. Furthermore, seed supply for native species relies, for the most part, on natural collection, subject to natural population abundance with wide yearly variations. This situation has led to the current trend of culturing more readily available exotic species, but with a potentially undesirable i mpact on the natural environment. The centralizing of resources available in the region into a shared facility has been recommended by several expert meetings over the past 20 years. The establishment of a regional hatchery facility, supporting sustainable aquaculture through the seed production of native molluscan species was discussed at the FAO workshop ¿Regional shellfish hatchery: A feasibility study¿ held in Kingston, Jamaica, in October 2010, by representatives of Caribbean governments an d experts in the field. Molluscan species are particularly targeted due to their culture potential in terms of known techniques, simple grow-out technology and low impact activity on surrounding environment. It is proposed that a regional molluscan hatchery would produce seed for sale and distribution to grow-out operations in the region as well as provide technical support for the research on new species.

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