Thumbnail Image

Investing Back Home:Return Migration and Business Ownership in Albania

ESA Working Paper No. 07-08








Also available in:
No results found.

Related items

Showing items related by metadata.

  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (stand-alone)
    Internal mobility and international migration in Albania 2004
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    Using evidence from two recent data sources – the 2002 Albania Living Standards Measurement Survey (LSMS) and the 2001 Population Census of Albania – the paper documents the phenomena of internal and external migration in Albania, a country that in the past decade has experienced dramatic changes as it makes its transition to a more open market economy. Albania is a country on the move, both internally and internationally. This mobility plays a key role in household-level strategies to cope wit h the economic hardship of transition and it is perhaps the single most important political, social, and economic phenomenon in post-communist Albania. The order of magnitude of the observed flows is astonishing. Almost one half of all Albanian households have had direct exposure to migration events, either through direct temporary migration of a household member or through their children living abroad. One out of two children who since 1990 no longer live with their parents is now living abro ad, primarily in Greece and Italy. For obvious reasons, Greece also remains the preferred destination of temporary migrants, although – and despite the higher costs associated with it – the shares of Albanians temporarily migrating to Italy and Germany have increased substantially in recent years. The paper also provides a micro level analysis of the household’s migration decision. The role of household and community characteristics, including relative deprivation and the importance of social networks, in the decision to migrate are assessed.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Document
    Moving Forward, Looking Back: The Impact of Migration and Remittances on Assets, Consumption, and Credit Constraints in the Rural Philippines
    Agnes R. Quisumbing and Scott McNiven
    2007
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    This paper investigates the impact of migration and remittances on asset holdings, consumption expenditures, and credit constraint status of households in origin communities, using a unique longitudinal data set from the Philippines. The Bukidnon Panel Study follows up 448 families in rural Mindanao who were first interviewed in 1984/85 by the International Food Policy Research Institute and the Research Institute for Mindanao Culture, Xavier University. The study interviewed the original resp ondents and a sample of their offspring, both those who have remained in the same area and those who have moved to a different location. This paper examines the impact of remittances from outside the original survey villages on parent households, taking into account the endogeneity of the number of migrants and remittances received to characteristics of the origin households and communities, completed schooling of sons and daughters, and shocks to both the origin households and migrants. When b oth migration and remittances are treated as endogenous, a larger number of migrant children reduces the values of nonland assets, total expenditures per adult equivalent, and some components of household expenditures. On the other hand, remittances have a positive impact on housing and consumer durables, nonland assets, and total expenditures (per adult equivalent). The largest impact of remittances is on the total value of nonland assets (driven by increased acquisition of consumer durables) and on educational expenditures. Thus, despite the costs that parents may incur in sending migrants to other communities, the returns, in terms of remittances, play an important role in enabling investment in assets and human capital in sending communities. Neither migration nor remittances affects current credit constraint status.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    Migrant workers and remittances in the context of COVID-19 in sub-Saharan Africa 2020
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    African migrants stimulate economic growth and development in areas of destination, transit and origin through their labour, skills transfer, consumption and investments. Their remittances also make significant contributions to food security, human capital, rural development and overall Gross Domestic Product (GDP) in areas of origin. The impact of COVID-19 affects migrant workers disproportionally. Often precarious working conditions and overcrowded living and transport arrangements increase their vulnerability to contagion and loss of employment, threatening their health and livelihoods. Those working under informal arrangements, commonly in the agriculture sector, are largely excluded from accessing real-time reliable information, social protection, healthcare and government response measures. Urban-to-rural return migration increases due to lockdowns and job losses in cities. This context poses challenges and opportunities in rural sectors, while many return migrants face stigmatization as potential carriers of the virus. A 23 percent decline in remittances flow into sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), as a result of economic downturns, restrictions in movement and challenges sending transfers to SSA, is expected to heavily impact the livelihoods of households and countries that rely on them for food and other basic expenditures, such as health and education.

Users also downloaded

Showing related downloaded files

No results found.