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Applying reduced impact logging to advance sustainable forest management










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    Book (stand-alone)
    Commercial timber harvesting in the natural forests of Mozambique 2002
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    This case study is one of a series of publications produced by the Forest Harvesting, Trade and Marketing Branch of FAO in an effort to promote environmentally sound forest harvesting and engineering practices. The purpose of these studies is to highlight both the promise of environmentally sound forest harvesting technologies as a component of sustainable forest management, and the constraints that must be overcome in order to assure widespread adoption of those technologies. The FAO Forest Pro ducts Division wishes to express its appreciation to the Forest Harvesting and Transport Branch of Eduardo Mondlane University, Maputo, Mozambique for its cooperation in the publication of this revised and translated version of a report on forest harvesting in the natural forests of Mozambique. The earlier, Portuguese-language version of the report was published in November 1999 under the title “Eficiência no Aproveitamento Comercial de Madeira em Toros”. FAO and the author also wish to acknowle dge the kind support given by the management and field staff of the companies ECOSEMA in the Province of Sofala, ÁLVARO de CASTRO in the Province of Gaza, MITI in the Province of Cabo Delgado, SOMANOL in the Province of Nampula, and ARCA as well as SRZ in the Province of Zambézia, throughout the implementation of this study. The field studies and analyses described in this report were carried out by Henning Fath, until recently Docent of Forest Harvesting and Transport in the Faculty of Agricult ure and Forestry at Eduardo Mondlane University under a GTZ/CIM-assignment, who also prepared the written report. FAO Forestry Officer Joachim Lorbach managed the preparation of the report for publication in the FAO Forest Harvesting Case-Study Series. Editing and final layout for publication were done by Dennis Dykstra.
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    Forest assessment and monitoring 2002
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    The Global Forest Resources Assessment 2000 (FRA 2000) is now completed, but work has already begun on the next global assessment. The expert consultation "Global Forest Resources Assessments - Linking National and International Efforts", known as Kotka IV, brought together international experts in July 2002 to address future concepts and strategies. The articles in this issue of Unasylva are adapted for a wider audience from papers prepared for the meeting. Without going into technical detail, they explore links among assessment and monitoring, national and international information needs, criteria and indicators for sustainable forest management, and reporting of forest-related information to international instruments. The technical details can be found on the FAO Web site (www.fao.org/forestry) and will be published in the Kotka IV proceedings.
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    Book (series)
    Sustainable management of logged tropical forests in the Caribbean to ensure long-term productivity 2021
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    To facilitate sustainable management of logged forests in the Caribbean, forest authorities of Belize, Guyana, Suriname, and Trinidad and Tobago, jointly with the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations and the University of Hamburg as a scientific partner, implemented the regional project “Ensuring Long-Term Productivity of Lowland Tropical Forests in the Caribbean” financed by the German Federal Ministry of Food and Agriculture. The main objective of the project was to support the sustainable management of logged forests to maintain productivity and prevent further degradation. For this purpose, extensive field studies were conducted in the project countries, which resulted in silvicultural recommendations presented in this publication. The project findings revealed that the application of general sustainable forest management protocols for tropical production forests that set limits on harvesting does not necessarily ensure sustained productivity if the composition and management of the residual stand are not considered. The ratio of the number of harvested trees to the remaining future crop trees can provide a simple indicator of the sustainability of harvest. If the current harvest exceeds the number of future crop trees, the harvest is not sustainable. As a rule of thumb, at least one, preferably two future crop trees per harvested tree should be retained for future use. Protection of future crop trees can be a simple and practical approach to prevent high grading and degradation of the forest growing stock. The importance of reduced impact logging to reduce unnecessary damage to the future crop trees and for sustainable forest management, in general, is stressed.

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