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Safeguards for people and the planet









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    Book (stand-alone)
    Framework for Environmental and Social Management 2022
    The Framework for Environmental and Social Management (FESM) establishes environmental and social performance requirements for FAO programming. The FESM includes key elements of a human rights-based approach with the goal to ensure that people and the environment are protected from any potential adverse impacts of FAO programmes and projects. It is also intended to ensure that all stakeholders have ample opportunities to actively participate in the activities of programmes and projects, and have access to effective channels to voice their concerns about them. The FESM reflects the organization’s commitment to sustainability with a new set of guiding principles, two operational pillars and nine environmental and social standards. Together they delineate the mandatory requirements related to the identification, assessment and management of multiple environmental and social risks and impacts associated with programmes and projects supported and implemented by FAO. The FESM introduces an innovative process of climate change and disaster risk screening to identify potential risks, mitigation and resilience measures. It also includes new and updated requirements to conserve and restore renewable natural resources and biodiversity; protect animal welfare; foster resilient livelihoods; manage wastes and non-pesticide hazardous materials; promote resource efficiency; protect community health and promote decent jobs; strengthen requirements for dealing with gender-based violence including the prevention of sexual exploitation and abuse; respect Indigenous Peoples living in voluntary isolation; and enhance accountability, conflict resolution and grievance mechanisms.
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    Article
    Creating biodiversity safeguards for nature-based solutions for climate change mitigation and adaptation
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
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    There have been many trials and pilot experiments to mainstream biodiversity into the climate change regime through initiatives like REDD+ and Ecosystem based approaches. Nature-based Solutions (NbS) are being viewed as yet another opportunity to synergize climate and biodiversity actions. However, NbS is being promoted more as a climate solution than a biodiversity solution, while the word “nature” makes it seem like it may be good also for biodiversity. Past experiences show that not all forest-based projects conserved biodiversity, while some turned out to be harmful due to their “mitigation-centric” approach. Carbon sequestration by ecosystems is just a part of the overall services it provides, which include a range of provisioning, supporting, regulating and cultural services. All these are not accounted for when we focus on mitigation. This has led to a fear among the conservation community whether these solutions actually focus on biodiversity or just climate. It is important that NbS considers the overall value of nature beyond its carbon sink capability. Therefore, the socio-ecological systems mechanism needs to be well studied, both through the biodiversity and climate lens, to keep proper safety nets for biodiversity and dependent communities. In this background, this paper discusses: (i) trade-offs associated with former forest-based mechanisms under the climate regime; (ii) path shown by different organizations and researchers for the implementation of NbS; and (iii) ways to introduce biodiversity safeguards for NbS, considering social-ecological interactions. NbS is seen as a broad-spectrum solution and must advocate biodiversity conservation and sustainable development. NbS is taking an important position in both CBD and UNFCCC negotiations and future COPs will be instrumental in deciding the guidelines for NbS. This paper will add to the ongoing debate using also the available literature on NbS since its inception. Keywords: Climate change, Biodiversity conservation, Deforestation and forest degradation, Landscape management, Sustainable forest management ID: 3486767
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    Book (stand-alone)
    Reporting and retrieval of lost fishing gear: recommendations for developing effective programmes 2022
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    Abandoned, lost, or otherwise discarded fishing gear, alternately known as ALDFG or ghost gear is the most harmful form of marine plastic litter for marine animals and habitats. It also can impede safe navigation, mars beaches and reefs, and causes economic losses to fisheries and other marine-dependent industries across the globe. While current estimates of the amount of ALDFG in the ocean are not available, a growing body of evidence has documented high rates of ALDFG in fisheries around the world, with coincident costs to fisheries, harm to the environment, and safety risks. Because most fishing gear has significant plastic components, the negative impacts from ALDFG also include less direct but longer term impacts associated with other plastic pollution and microplastics including negative effects on biota, water quality and even human health. Advancing solutions to ALDFG on a global scale has gained momentum with the efforts of the FAO, the United Nations Environmental Program (UNEP), and the IMO through their multilateral fora (COFI, UNEA and MEPC); the publication and endorsement of the Voluntary Guidelines for the Marking of Fishing Gear (VGMFG); the IMO action plan to address marine plastic litter from ships; the creation of the Global Ghost Gear Initiative (GGGI); and the establishment of the Joint Group of Experts on the Scientific Aspects of Marine Environmental Pollution (GESAMP) Working Group 43. These efforts reflect the growing understanding that ALDFG is a considerable and damaging source of MPL in the ocean. With the publication of the VGMFG and the Best Practice Framework (BPF) for the management of fishing gear, there are now references for how to prevent loss of fishing gear and prevent harm from ALDFG. Focusing on two key recommendations of the VGMFG and the BPF, this report describes systems for fisher-led reporting and retrieval of lost fishing gear, identifies critical elements of successful programs, and recommends next steps for countries to develop successful programs.

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