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Rural Social Protection - Promoting resilient livelihoods and the economic potential of the rural poor and vulnerable










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    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    Climate-Smart Agriculture (CSA) - Boosting agricultural productivity and incomes while adapting to climate change 2019
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    Agriculture suffers more than 26 percent of the damage and loss caused by climate-related disasters, disproportionately affecting the poorest and most vulnerable, three-quarters of whom rely on agriculture or natural resources for their livelihoods. A single major natural disaster can undermine years of development work and climate change can have major long-term repercussions. On the flip side, agricultural sectors are often unsustainable, contributing to greenhouse gas emissions and degrading the natural resource base. FAO has developed a climate-smart agriculture (CSA) approach to sustainably increase agricultural productivity and incomes while adapting and building resilience to climate change, and reducing and/or removing greenhouse gas emissions. The approach has been widely adopted internationally and is key to achieving Nationally Determined Contribution (NDC) commitments as well as SDG targets. Building on successful on-the-ground implementation, policy commitments and partnerships, this initiative will scale up and strengthen CSA through the concerted integration of disaster risk-reduction and management interventions, and through greater consideration of social aspects (in particular, gender-related responses and social protection). Such an approach will allow the identification of interventions that optimize SDG synergies and reduce social and environmental trade-offs.
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    Drivers and stressors of resilience to food insecurity – Evidence from 35 countries
    Background paper for The State of Food and Agriculture 2021. FAO Agricultural Development Economics Working Paper 21-09
    2021
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    Resilience is often associated with multivalued and multi-faceted strategies, programs, and projects. After approximately 15 years of empirical evidence in the literature, few research questions remain unexplored and unanswered, especially with the recent occurrence of a global pandemic. In this paper, we are assessing whether there are few and consistently relevant elements that determine resilience capacity as well as investigating which shocks are most dramatically reducing resilience. We also investigate which coping strategies are most frequently adopted in the presence of shocks. Our results show that diversification of income sources, education, access to land, livestock, and agricultural inputs, are the main drivers of households’ resilience capacity. Moreover, the most prevailing shocks are found to be natural, health and livelihood-related shocks. In addition to this, we show that reducing the quantity and quality of food consumed, seeking an extra job, selling assets, taking credit, relying on relatives and social networks are the most adopted coping strategies. Finally, we found that coping strategies are able to mitigate the adverse effects of shocks on resilience capacity; however, they are not sufficient to offset their long-term negative consequences. Our conclusion is that adequate investments in resilience are conditional to a) engaging with activities that are broadly consistent across countries and b) fine-tuning the interventions based on context-specificity.
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    Document
    Improving Tenure Security for the Rural Poor: Rwanda – Country Case Study 2006
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    Most of the world’s poor work in the “informal economy” – outside of recognized and enforceable rules. Thus, even though most have assets of some kind, they have no way to document their possessions because they lack formal access to legally recognized tools such as deeds, contracts and permits. The Commission on Legal Empowerment of the Poor (CLEP) is the first global anti-poverty initiative focusing on the link between exclusion, poverty and law, looking for practical solutions to the cha llenges of poverty. CLEP aims to make legal protection and economic opportunity the right of all, not the privilege of the few. (see http://legalempowerment.undp.org/) FAO, with donor funding from Norway, has undertaken a set of activities for “Improving tenure security of the rural poor” in order to meet the needs of FAO member countries and, in turn, support the CLEP. This work falls within the FAO corporate strategy on “Sustainable rural livelihoods and more equitable access to resources ”. Recognizing that secure access to land and other natural resources (forests, water, fisheries, pastures, etc.) is a crucial factor for eradication of food insecurity and rural poverty, FAO’s cross-departmental and cross-disciplinary work focused 2005-2006 activities on sub-Saharan Africa which has the world’s highest percentage of poor and hungry people.

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