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The Participatory Rapid Appraisal on perceptions and practices of fisherfolk on fishery resource management in an artisanal fishing community in Cameroon









Demuynck K. and DETMAC Associates, The Participatory Rapid Appraisal on perceptions 1994 and practices of fisherfolk in fishery resource management in an artisanal fishing community lfl Cameroon. Cotonou, Programme for the Integrated Development of Artisanal Fisheries in West Africa, IDAF/\VP/60, 32 p.


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    A manual on rapid appraisal methods for coastal communities - BOBP\MAG\6 1987
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    Rapid Rural Appraisal, or RRA, is a repertoire of rapid approaches to collecting information and identifying problems. It is increasingly being used by development agencies, government departments and non-government organisations (NGOs ) the world over to learn about conditions ‘in the field’. Until now, it has most frequently been applied in agricultural communities and rural areas (thus, Rapid Rural Appraisal). However, as it gains acceptance, it is being used in a wider range of situations an d conditions. It has been used to find out more about urban communities and to look at problems outside the agricultural sector, in such areas as forestry, health, nutrition, family planning and small industry development. Until now, RRA techniques have rarely been applied, in a systematic way, in coastal communities and, in particular, in the fisheries sector. But, interestingly, some of the techniques which make up the RRA approach are already in use by individuals or groups involved in fisher ies development. Many people working in fisheries development also have their own techniques for collecting information and arriving at conclusions which could and should be included in the RRA repertoire. What has been lacking so far are attempts to use RRA systematically in looking at fishing communities, their way of life and livelihood, and the coastal ecosystems in which they live
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    The state of artisanal fisheries in West Africa in 1995 1996
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    Development strategy during the 1960 and 1970s was based on the philosophy that developing countries lacked improved technology and capital for speeding up their development:Industrialization was promoted in order to capitalize on the abundant fish resources. However, the anticipated expansion of the economy did not happen and the development approach shifted towards an integrated rural strategy where emphasis is put on the community as a whole to upgrade incomes and the quality of life throug h technical assistance and the active participation of fisherfolk and the community. In this context, emphasis was initially placed on the Community Fishery Centre (CFC)concept as a means of promoting artisanal fishery development. But it became apparent that the presence of a complex of facilities and seivices tailored to meet local needs was no guarantee that the structures/facilities would be used or that development would occur. The active participation of fisherfolk and the mobilisation o f local and community resources was imperative in order to assure sustainability of initiatives undertaken by development projects and/or the community. So far and in general terms, the IDAF Programme has worked under the context of abundant or seemingly adequate fishery resources with moderate population pressure. The scenario is however changing (and very fast for that matter) and wewou!d soon face the triple constraints of reduced or depleting fish stocks, degrading environment and increa sing population pressure. Like in other sectors, it must be anticipated that just to survive, parts of the population surplus in the fishing communities will enter the artisanal fisheries, which will increase the competition for the resources among the small scale fisherfolk in addition to the prevailing competition between the artisanal and industrial fisheries, with their attendant effect on the environment.This scenario calls for a côntinuation of the integrated participatory strategy whi ch remains relevant to the development of artisanal fisheries in West Africa. However, the emphasis needs to be placed on the elements and mechanisms that favour the ustainability of initiatives:responsible fishing, the empowerment processes that ensure the devolution of major resource management and development decisions to the local community, the strengthening of national human and institutional capacities at all levels for a sustainable and equitable fisheries resources management and development, as well as in the follow-up and consolidation of past achievements.
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    Participatory rural appraisal- Vulnerability study of Ayeyarwady Delta fishing communities in Myanmar and social protection opportunities 2019
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    The Participatory Rural Appraisal: Vulnerability Study of Ayeyarwady Delta Fishing Communities in Myanmar and Their Social Protection Opportunities (PRA-V study) seeks to inform fisheries management and social protection processes of the key vulnerability issues faced by fishers at the five pilot sites selected for fisheries co-management. An analysis of the PRA-V study information leads to some broad conclusions. The PRA-V study suggests that the most vulnerable communities are in Maubin and Hinthada. In both areas, community fisheries co-management is unlikely enough to reduce household or individual vulnerability significantly. The communities in Thabaung, Labutta and Dedaye appear to offer more livelihood opportunities for local people. In these areas, improving fishing ground access would likely have a positive effect on the overall livelihoods of people. However, the remoteness of the two coastal areas could prohibit social and economic development. The PRA-V study also explored gender vulnerability aspects, focusing on female-headed households and individual women from fisher households. Due to the patriarchal social structure and cultural norms, many female-headed households appear to be more vulnerable than male-headed households. The PRA-V study suggests that there is gender disparity in terms of vulnerability in many communities. Recommendations for further Ayeyarwady fisheries law reforms, fisheries management and social protection interventions that would reduce fisher household vulnerability are included in the discussion section.

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