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FAO Policy on Indigenous and Tribal Peoples









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    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    Indigenous Peoples in the Asia-Pacific region
    Factsheet on Indigenous Women for Asia and the Pacific
    2018
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    The factsheet gives a brief overview of indigenous peoples in the Asia and the Pacific region, which is home to the largest number of indigenous people with 70 percent of the 370 million original inhabitants worldwide. They share a strong connection to their lands and have developed a rich body of traditional knowledge on agro biodiversity and preservation of endangered seeds that enriches all. However, across the Asia Pacific indigenous peoples are among the most vulnerable and marginalized peoples. Recent estimates indicate that indigenous peoples make up approximately 5 percent of the global population and they comprise about 15 percent of the global extreme poor. The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) has long realized that in order to achieve its mandate of eradicating food and nutrition insecurity and poverty through sustainable agricultural development and natural resource management, development efforts must include farmers, fisherfolks and forest dependent people, including indigenous peoples, as key actors and partners. Indigenous peoples in the region include tribal peoples, hill tribes, aboriginal people and ethnic minorities. Irrespective of their legal status or the way in which countries refer to them, many indigenous peoples of Asia, experience non-recognition of their cultural identity.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    FAO regional strategy for collaboration with Indigenous Peoples and people of African descent in Latin America and the Caribbean
    Revised edition
    2022
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    Historically, FAO has engaged in various collaborative efforts with Indigenous Peoples and people of African descent at the global level, which have been strengthened through mutual understanding and respect. These groups are key actors in the fight against poverty and hunger, and the Organization recognizes their valuable contributions to the fulfillment of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. In Latin America and the Caribbean, nearly half of the rural population is comprised of Indigenous Peoples and people of African descent. They face major challenges and there have been serious violations of their collective and individual rights, while their ancestral knowledge and practices are crucial for the sustainable development of the region. These issues have led to the formulation of the "FAO regional strategy for collaboration with Indigenous Peoples and People of African descent in Latin America and the Caribbean" the result of a long process of exchanges and consultation with their leaders and organizations at the local, national and regional levels, carried out almost entirely against the backdrop of the COVID-19 pandemic since the beginning of 2020. The regional strategy is a useful tool to guide the collaborative actions in the region between FAO, the governments and Indigenous Peoples and people of African descent, with the aim of achieving more inclusive, efficient, resilient and sustainable agrifood systems.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    Free Prior and Informed Consent: An indigenous peoples’ right and a good practice for local communities 2016

    This Free, Prior and Informed Consent (FPIC) Manual is designed as a tool for project practitioners of a broad range of projects and programmes of any development organization, by providing information about the right to FPIC and how it can be implemented in six steps.

    In an FPIC process, the “how”, “when” and “with and by whom”, are as important as “what” is being proposed. For an FPIC process to be effective and result in consent or lack of it, the way in which the process is conducted is paramount. The time allocated for the discussions among the indigenous peoples, the cultural appropriateness of the way the information is conveyed, and the involvement of the whole community, including key groups like women, the elderly and the youth in the process, are all essential. A thorough and well carried FPIC process helps guarantee everyone’s right to self-determination, allowing them to participate in decisions that affect their lives.

    This FPIC Manual will ena ble field practitioners to incorporate FPIC into project and programmes’ design and implementation, ensuring that indigenous peoples’ rights are duly respected. FPIC can be considered the “gold standard” because it allows for the highest form of participation of local stakeholders in development projects.

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