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Importance of agriculture and trade policy coherence for agricultural transformation in Africa

FAO Trade Policy Briefs No. 34 Trade & Food Security










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    Book (stand-alone)
    Policy coherence for agricultural transformation in African least developed countries (LDCs)
    Aligning agriculture and trade policymaking processes
    2018
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    In many developing and least-developed countries (LDCs), the transformation of the agriculture sector is key for improving domestic food security and nutrition and for promoting economic development. However, efforts to raise agricultural productivity and develop inclusive and competitive agricultural value chains are often hampered by market- and trade-related bottlenecks, while initiatives promoting agricultural commercialisation, diversification and trade are often curbed by bottlenecks at farm or post-harvest levels. In this context, FAO, in collaboration with the Enhanced Integrated Framework (EIF) and European Centre for Development Policy Management (ECDPM), carried out a Multi-partner Programme Support Mechanism (FMM) Project on Trade related capacity development for food security and nutrition in Eastern and Southern Africa (ESA) to contribute to improved policy coherence for agricultural development and food security in these countries. This report presents the main findings of four country studies conducted under the FMM Project. The studies, carried out in Mozambique, Rwanda, Tanzania and Zambia during 2017, analysed the alignment of agriculture and trade policies and the coordination between agriculture and trade policymaking processes in these four countries. The report begins with advocating policy coherence and its relevance for African countries in the context of agriculture and trade, before explaining the objectives of the FMM Project and its approach. Section 2 presents the main findings from the country studies in the form of key messages. Finally, Section 3 concludes with recommendations for development partners, national governments, regional organisations and other relevant stakeholders.
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    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    Trade related capacity development for food security and nutrition 2017
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    The "Trade related capacity development project" aims to a) strengthen technical capacities in the area of trade and food security in the Eastern and Southern Africa region, through facilitating targeted e-learning courses in the region; and, b)improve coherence between agriculture and trade-related policy processes at the national level, through policy and resource analysis, stakeholder consultations and programme development (pilots in Mozambique, Tanzania and Zambia)
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    Harmonized border fisheries inspectors guide for promotion of regional fish trade in Eastern-Southern Africa 2015
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    Fisheries are one of the most significant renewable resources that Eastern and Southern Africa (ESA) and Indian Ocean (IO) countries have for food security, livelihoods and economic growth. Efforts however, need to be made to ensure that as the population in these countries grows, and demand for food and employment likewise grows, the benefits that fishery resources provide, are protected through sustainable management and value-addition. The IOC-led Program for the Implementation of a Regional Fisheries Strategy for the ESA-IO region (IRFS) [SMARTFISH] was launched in February 2011 with the aim of contributing to an increased level of social, economic and environmental development and regional integration in the region through the sustainable exploitation of fisheries resources. Underpinning the Program is the harmonization of the region’s strategies and the strengthening of regional integration especially in partnership with COMESA, EAC and IGAD. The ultimate beneficiaries are fisher men, coastal communities and wider populations in Burundi, Comoros, Djibouti, Democratic Republic of Congo, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Kenya, Madagascar, Malawi, Mauritius, Rwanda, Seychelles, Somalia, Sudan, South Sudan, Swaziland, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia and Zimbabwe. In terms of trade, the traditional focus on large international trading blocks and fostering trade from Africa to these blocks, has meant less attention has been paid to developing regional trade, which is thought to have great potentia l and consequently is a key focus of the program. Some of the most pressing issues facing regional fisheries trade relate to trade barriers in both regional and domestic markets. Average import tariffs for example between countries in the region are generally much higher than in developed countries and are thought to have weakened intra-regional trade significantly. Non-tariff barriers include challenges with border controls and documentation requirements which reduce competitiveness through inc reased costs to exporters. This document is the products of a regional initiative involving fisheries experts from seven countries: DR Congo, Malawi, Kenya, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia and Zimbabwe. Based on the core principles of food inspection as well as internationally recognized best practices for safe and wholesome food, the guide promotes the recommendations of the Codex Alimentarius Commission and the UN FAO Code of Conduct for Responsible Fisheries. It provides the necessary administrative and procedural guidelines for the preparation and execution of official controls by Border Fisheries Inspectors and we anticipate it will be an important resource for regional economic communities such as

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