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FAO and EU Food Facility. Ex-Post Economic Impact Assessment







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    Book (stand-alone)
    Bridging the Gap
    Fao's Programme for Gender Equality in agriculture and rural development
    2009
    Today, the spectre of hunger has returned to many developing countries. The number of undernourished people has risen above one billion, or one sixth of humanity. The international community faces other daunting challenges, including the global economic downturn, plummeting levels of trade and investment, growing scarcity of natural resources, and the impact of climate change. We cannot overcome those challenges while age-old, ingrained ideas of gender roles deny women’s full partici pation in decision-making and social and economic development. Rural women make up the majority of the world’s poor. Much of their work as household providers and agricultural producers is unpaid, making their contribution virtually invisible. They have far less access than men to land ownership, financial services, training and other means of increasing agricultural production and improving family income, nutrition and health. Women and female-headed households are disproportionately affected by economic recession and higher food prices. Social and economic inequalities between men and women undermine food security and hold back economic growth and advances in agriculture. That is why FAO’s new strategic framework identifies gender equity in access to resources, goods, services and decision-making in rural areas as one of the Organization’s key objectives for the next 10 years. Gender equity will be essential to implementing the decisions of the World Summit on Foo d Security, held in Rome in November 2009. By mainstreaming gender equity into all of its programmes for agriculture and rural development, FAO aims at strengthening the impact of its support to member countries, and achieving the goals of gender equality, the eradication of hunger and poverty, and food security for all.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    European Union Food Facility Foundations for Future Action
    An Initial Review of Selected Projects
    2011
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    The combined impact of the high food prices crisis of 2007-2008 and the global financial crisis of 2009 has pushed an estimated 105 million more people into hunger and malnutrition. These events have threatened to reverse critical gains made toward reducing poverty and hunger as outlined in the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). In an effort to quell global food security concerns, world leaders have addressed the need for urgent action in several high level meetings, including the 2009 W orld Summit on Food Security, and two consecutive G8 Summits. The European Union has been at the forefront of the food crisis response, generously allocating one billion euros through the European Union Food Facility (EUFF) to help bridge the gap between short-term emergency relief and longer-term development support. In 2009, FAO began carrying out projects worth € 228 million (approximately USD 314 million) in 28 countries in Africa, Asia, Latin America and the Caribbean through the EUFF . With these projects coming to a close in mid-2011, FAO initiated an exercise to document initial outcomes of selected projects in 13 of the 28 countries. Though still too early to evaluate their full impact on food production and food security, “Foundations for Future Action: an Initial Review of Selected Projects”, a new report published by FAO, highlights some early EUFF project achievements, together with lessons learned and suggestions for the way forward.
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    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    Southern Madagascar | Response overview (October 2021) 2021
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    An exceptionally prolonged drought in southern Madagascar most likely due to the effects of climate change compounded by multiple other shocks has led to a hunger crisis in the region. The long lean season and sandstorms have resulted in the second consecutive year of poor harvests, significantly affecting households’ livelihoods and food security.The humanitarian situation has been exacerbated by the adverse effects of COVID‑19 and related containment measures, which disrupted market supply chains. Price increases of basic foodstuffs were also recorded, leaving many families who have depleted their reserves unable to buy food in the market. Insecurity in parts of the deep south, as well as the resurgence of various crop and animal pests and diseases – a new outbreak of Rift Valley fever and a looming threat of locusts – have also led to worrying levels of food insecurity and malnutrition in the region. Vulnerable households struggle to access food and income. Many are forced to adopt negative coping mechanisms such as selling productive assets and reducing the quantity, frequency and quality of meals, with some communities resorting to consuming almost exclusively wild foods. Finally, if the Malagasy migratory locust outbreak is not contained, it would result in a major upsurge, threatening larger areas across the country. Unpredictable consequences would further worsen the already alarming situation in the Grand Sud, where people are experiencing high levels of food insecurity. Curbing the spread of the locusts and scaling up livelihoods assistance to provide affected households with essential inputs during the main agricultural season is key to allow them to quickly produce food, generate income and strengthen their resilience.

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