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Policy and Legal frameworks to support effective ecosystem control of Insect Pests in Asian Rice production systems






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    Book (stand-alone)
    Ten years of IPM training in Asia. From farmer field school to community IPM 2002
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    A comprehensive account of integrated pest management (IPM) as a farmer-centred and local need-responsive approach, which was developed on the rice farms of Southeast Asia to tackle the dangers of excessive pesticide use. The FAO programme owes it success to the pioneering farmer field school (FFS) approach that was first tried with Indonesian paddy farmers in early 1990 and has since become the model for farmer education in Asia. More than 2 million rice farmers in Asia have taken part in over 75 000 farmer field schools between 1990 and 1999, boosting their yields and incomes, cutting down the use of chemical pest killers and improving the ecological health of their fields. Above all, it has given them greater control over their livelihoods and greater confidence to face new challenges. This publication includes step-by-step instructions on organizing and running farmer field schools along with detailed case studies of farmer field schools in Southeast Asia. A separate section outlin es the IPM programme activities in Bangladesh, Cambodia, China, Indonesia, Nepal, Sri Lanka and Viet Nam.
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    Assessing and promoting trees outside forests (TOF) in Asian rice production landscapes
    The Asia regional rice initiative Biodiversity, landscapes & ecosystem services in Rice Production Systems
    2014
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    Mature planted or spontaneous tree systems scattered throughout or surrounding agricultural landscapes have been proven to be an excellent source of goods and services for increasing the socio-economic and environmental sustainability of agricultural landscapes. In spite of this, their role in supporting the livelihoods and the well-being of rice-based smallholder farmer communities and in environmental sustainability is mostly overlooked. Consequently, their potential contribution is still far from being fully exploited. The “Assessment of Trees outside forests in Asian rice production landscapes” pilot project was developed in 2013 in the framework (Biodiversity, landscape, and ecosystem services) of the FAO Regional Rice Initiative for Asia, with the final objective of providing policy and decision makers with evidence of the contribution that tree systems located in rice production landscapes can provide in terms of socio-economic and environmental sustainability, as well as in ter ms of resilience. This document reports on the outcomes of the project and could be used as a reference to feed higher-level national and regional dialogues, in order to promote an integrated and sustainable approach to the management of rice production landscapes.
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    Guide to the classical biological control of insect pests in planted and natural forests 2019
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    Insect pests damage millions of hectares of forest worldwide each year. Moreover, the extent of such damage is increasing as international trade grows, facilitating the spread of insect pests, and as the impacts of climate change become more evident. Classical biological control is a well-tried, cost-effective approach to the management of invasive forest pests. It involves the importing of “natural enemies” of non-native pests from their countries of origin with the aim of establishing permanent, self-sustaining populations capable of sustainably reducing pest populations below damaging levels. A great deal of knowledge on classical biological control has been accumulated worldwide in the last few decades. This publication, which was written by a team of experts, distils that information in a clear, concise guide aimed at helping forest-health practitioners and forest managers – especially in developing countries – to implement successful classical biological control programmes. It provides general theory and practical guidelines, explains the “why” and “how” of classical biological control in forestry, and addresses the potential risks associated with such programmes. It features 11 case studies of successful efforts worldwide to implement classical biological control.

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