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Fishing Boat Construction: 3. Building a Ferrocement Fishing Boat










Riley, R.O.N.; Turner, J.M.M. Fishing boat construction: 3. Building a ferrocement fishing boat. FAO Fisheries Technical Paper. No. 354. FAO, Rome. 1995. 149p.


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    Fishing boat designs: 2. V-bottom boats of planked and plywood construction (Rev.2) 2004
    Timber remains the most common material for the construction of boats under 15 metres in length. There has been a change towards fibre-reinforced plastic in most developed countries and some developing countries but, in Africa, Asia and the Pacific, probably more than 90 percent of small fishing vessels are built of wood. The cost advantage of timber versus other materials is still sufficient to ensure that it will remain the dominant boatbuilding material for a long time to come in developing c ountries. However, unrestricted or illicit access to forest resources and the introduction of rational forestry management policies have caused and will continue to cause a scarcity of the sections of timbers traditionally favoured by boatbuilders. The resultant scarcity and high cost of good quality timber have not meant that less wooden boats are being built, but rather that vessel quality has deteriorated through the use of inferior timber and inadequate design strength. This updated and completely revised publication supersedes Revision 1 of FAO Fisheries Technical Paper 134 published in 1997. It follows an exhaustive study on structural timber design applied to wooden boat construction. The publication includes the designs of four small fishing vessels (from 5.2 to 8.5 metres), with comprehensive material specifications and lists, and provides detailed instructions for their construction, both planked and of plywood. The designs are appropriate for inshore and coastal fisheri es and emphasis has been placed on relative ease of construction and minimum wastage of timber.
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    Fishing boat construction: 4 - Building an undecked fibreglass reinforced plastic boat 2009
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    In many areas of the world, finding the type of timber needed to build a good quality wooden boat is becoming a problem. As a result, Fibreglass Reinforced Plastics (FRP) is beginning to be used by many wooden boat builders. The information provided in this manual relates specifically to production of a 4.5 m open fishing boat called the MDV- 1. It is a simple, easilydriven, seaworthy boat intended for both rowing and power propulsion. Its general-purpose design is suitable for inshore waters around the world. A general basic knowledge in the use of FRP as a boatbuilding material is presented and step by step construction of a 4.5 m open fishing boat using FRP is set out in detail. In addition, the booklet describes how to maintain an FRP boat and how to recognize fatigue problems. Some simple guidelines on how to repair minor damage to FRP are also included. The information is intended for less experienced boatbuilders who already have a plug or mould. (Making a plug is not easy and requires experience in reading line drawings and lofting frames.) It is assumed that people planning to build a boat already have a good, general understanding of basic hand tool use. This manual will also be a useful aid for maintaining and improving quality control practiced by boatbuilders who already have some experience working with this material. This manual should give boatbuilders and fishermen a better understanding of how FRP acts, how to recognize fa tigue problems and more serious damage, and how to carry out needed maintenance and repair.
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    Second FAO/Swedish training centre on small fishing boat design and construction. Entebbe, Uganda, 11 January - 6 March 1971. 1972
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    This document is the Report of the Second FAO/Swedish Training Centre on Small Fishing Boat Design and Construction, which was held at Entebbe, Uganda, from 11 January to 6 March 1971, sponsored by the Swedish International Development Authority. The Training Centre consisted of a Boatbuilding Course and a Seminar for Fisheries Officers. In the Boatbuilding Course 20 boatbuilders from Kenya (6), Tanzania (6), Uganda (7) and Malawi (1) were trained in low-cost construction techniques in wood and ferro-cement. The emphasis was on practical boatbuilding. Two wooden boats were completed and launched: a 9.3 m boat based on the lines of the traditional canoe, adapted for outboard motor propulsion, and a 7.5 m boat with an 8 hp inboards diesel engine. The hull of a 12.6 m trawler built of ferro-cement was constructed up to the stage of engine installation and decking. The Uganda Fisheries Department was in charge of completion of this boat and covered the cost of the engine. The boat was launched at the end of January 1972 and has completed successful trials. Two similar boats will be built for an FAO/DANIDA Fishermen’s Training Centre. The Seminar for Fisheries Officers was held at the Fisheries Training Institute, Entebbe, 22-27 February 1971 with 37 participants from Kenya, Nigeria, Sudan, Uganda, FAO and industry. Eighteen papers on various aspects of fishing boat development in the Lake Victoria region were presented and will be published separately together with th e recorded discussions. The importance of the traditional boatbuilder was stressed in papers and during the discussion, as eas the necessity of integrating boatbuilding training in a master plan for the introduction of new boat types, provision of credit and fishermen’s training.

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