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Spatial planning to ensure future coexistence between wildlife and people









FAO and IUCN SSC HWCCSG. 2023. Spatial planning to ensure future coexistence between wildlife and people. Rome.



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    The case study comes from Assam, India, where the pilot project was established between Chester Zoo (then North of England Zoological Society), United Kingdom and EcoSystems - India, a regional non-governmental organization (NGO), to learn about the conflict and determine the best way towards sustainable solutions with the impacted communities. This pilot phase became the catalyst for the Assam Haathi Project, which worked with local communities to understand the situation further and identify solutions for addressing the issue collaboratively. The project ran for 14 years, from 2004 to 2018, and conducted many activities to address the human-elephant conflict. This case study highlights a subset of activities that have been conducted by the Assam Haathi Project.
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    This factsheet on human-wildlife conflict focuses on elephants (Loxodonta africana) and was produced by the Sustainable Wildlife Management (SWM) Programme. The SWM Programme aims to reconcile the challenges of wildlife conservation with food security and rural socio-economic development. To meet this objective, an innovative behaviour change approach is being developed to address human-wildlife conflict (HWC) and create a more balanced coexistence between people and wild animals. The SWM Programme is being funded by the European Union with co-funding from the French Facility for Global Environment (FFEM) and the French Development Agency (AFD). The initiative is coordinated by a dynamic consortium of four partners, namely the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), the Center for International Forestry Research and World Agroforestry (CIFOR-ICRAF), the French Agricultural Research Centre for International Development (CIRAD) and the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS).

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