Thumbnail Image

Environmental capacity; An Approach to Marine Pollution Prevention









GESAMP (IMO/FAO/Unesco/WMO/WHO/IAEA/UN/UNEP Joint Group of Experts on the Scientific 1986 Aspects of Marine Pollution), Environmental Capacity. An approach to marine pollution prevention. Rep.Stud.GESAMP, (30):49 p.


Also available in:
No results found.

Related items

Showing items related by metadata.

  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (stand-alone)
    Global assessment of soil pollution
    Summary for policymakers
    2021
    Also available in:

    Soil pollution is invisible to the human eye, but it compromises the quality of the food we eat, the water we drink and the air we breathe and puts human and environmental health at risk. Most contaminants originate from human activities such as industrial processes and mining, poor waste management, unsustainable farming practices, accidents ranging from small chemical spills to accidents at nuclear power plants, and the many effects of armed conflicts. Pollution knows no borders: contaminants are spread throughout terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems and many are distributed globally by atmospheric transport. In addition, they are redistributed through the global economy by way of food and production chains. Soil pollution has been internationally recognized as a major threat to soil health, and it affects the soil’s ability to provide ecosystems services, including the production of safe and sufficient food, compromising global food security. Soil pollution hinders the achievement of many of the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), including those related to poverty elimination (SDG 1), zero hunger (SDG 2) and good health and well-being (SDG 3). Soil pollution hits the most vulnerable hardest, especially children and women (SDG 5). The supply of safe drinking water is threatened by the leaching of contaminants into groundwater and runoff (SDG 6). CO2 and N2O emissions from unsustainably managed soils accelerate climate change (SDG 13). Soil pollution contributes to land degradation and loss of terrestrial (SDG 15) and aquatic (SDG 14) biodiversity, and decreased security and resilience of cities (SDG 11), among others. The report addresses the extent and future trends of soil pollution, considering both point source and diffuse soil pollution, and describes the risks and impacts of soil pollution on health, the environment and food security – including land degradation and the burden of disease resulting from exposure to polluted soil. The process to develop the report involved in-depth regional assessments of soil pollution, and the regional chapters provide an overview of soil pollution issues at the global scale that is long overdue (Figure 1). The Editorial Board comprised over 30 international experts representing the ITPS, the Regional Soil Partnerships, relevant international fora and expert groups, and the private sector. The Summary for Policymakers presents the main findings of the report, together with options for action to facilitate global policy considerations in the UNEA process. The main report is a comprehensive publication which is available on the FAO website.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (stand-alone)
    Reporting and retrieval of lost fishing gear: recommendations for developing effective programmes 2022
    Also available in:

    Abandoned, lost, or otherwise discarded fishing gear, alternately known as ALDFG or ghost gear is the most harmful form of marine plastic litter for marine animals and habitats. It also can impede safe navigation, mars beaches and reefs, and causes economic losses to fisheries and other marine-dependent industries across the globe. While current estimates of the amount of ALDFG in the ocean are not available, a growing body of evidence has documented high rates of ALDFG in fisheries around the world, with coincident costs to fisheries, harm to the environment, and safety risks. Because most fishing gear has significant plastic components, the negative impacts from ALDFG also include less direct but longer term impacts associated with other plastic pollution and microplastics including negative effects on biota, water quality and even human health. Advancing solutions to ALDFG on a global scale has gained momentum with the efforts of the FAO, the United Nations Environmental Program (UNEP), and the IMO through their multilateral fora (COFI, UNEA and MEPC); the publication and endorsement of the Voluntary Guidelines for the Marking of Fishing Gear (VGMFG); the IMO action plan to address marine plastic litter from ships; the creation of the Global Ghost Gear Initiative (GGGI); and the establishment of the Joint Group of Experts on the Scientific Aspects of Marine Environmental Pollution (GESAMP) Working Group 43. These efforts reflect the growing understanding that ALDFG is a considerable and damaging source of MPL in the ocean. With the publication of the VGMFG and the Best Practice Framework (BPF) for the management of fishing gear, there are now references for how to prevent loss of fishing gear and prevent harm from ALDFG. Focusing on two key recommendations of the VGMFG and the BPF, this report describes systems for fisher-led reporting and retrieval of lost fishing gear, identifies critical elements of successful programs, and recommends next steps for countries to develop successful programs.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (stand-alone)
    Report of the Thirty-third Session of GESAMP, Rome, 5-9 May 2003 2003
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    The Joint Group of Experts on the Scientific Aspects of Marine Environmental Protection (GESAMP) held its Thirty-third Session at the Headquarters of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations in Rome from 5 to 9 May 2003. The Group considered a number of major topics at this session. The Group discussed the future of GESAMP and the completion of the Strategic Plan. GESAMP and its supporting agencies are committed to implementing the new Strategic Plan as soon as possible. The supporting agencies have agreed to initiate the development of the GESAMP pool of experts and to take concrete steps to establish the GESAMP office. GESAMP took note of UN General Assembly resolution A/RES/57/141 requesting the establishment of a regular global marine assessment (GMA) process by 2004 and proposed that it be involved in a significant way in that process. The main work item of GESAMP Working Group on the Evaluation of the Hazards of Harmful Substances Carried by Ships focused on t he re-evaluation of the hazards of the substances listed in the International Bulk Chemicals (IBC) Code, of which a total of 680 substances have now been evaluated. GESAMP noted progress made with the completion of the hazard profiles for 19 vegetable, animal and fish oils. Working Group on Environmental Exposure Models for Application in Seafood Risk Analysis is presently focusing on the development and testing of exposure assessment models for organic chemicals, especially in order to identify bioaccumulation models which could be useful in predicting the safety of seafood harvested from a given water body. GESAMP further noted the current concerns about the pollution caused by the accident of the tanker "Prestige", which now lies on the seabed at a water depth greater than 3000 metres, and noted that a series of scientific questions await major research on behaviour and impact of oil and other substances released in the oceans, particularly at great depths.

Users also downloaded

Showing related downloaded files

No results found.