Thumbnail Image

Capture fisheries and aquaculture in the Kyrgyz Republic: current status and planning.










Sarieva, M.; Alpiev, M.; Van Anrooy, R.; Jørgensen, J.; Thorpe, A.; Mena Millar, A. Capture fisheries and aquaculture in the Kyrgyz Republic: current status and planning. FAO Fisheries Circular. No. 1030. Rome, FAO. 2008. 108p.


Also available in:
No results found.

Related items

Showing items related by metadata.

  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (series)
    Inland capture fisheries and aquaculture in the Republic of Uzbekistan: current status and planning. 2009
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    Resources of the Republic of Uzbekistan, requested assistance from the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), under its Technical Cooperation Programme (TCP), for the sustainable development and management of the fisheries sector in the country. FAO approved the project “Development of strategic partnerships in support of responsible fisheries and aquaculture development in Uzbekistan”, TCP/UZB/3103 (D), in August 2007. This FAO Fisheries and Aquaculture Circula r has two main aims. First, it intends to inform those interested in inland capture fisheries and aquaculture in Uzbekistan about the current situation with regard to fishery resources and their utilization in the country. Second, it attempts to provide the results of a participatory policy and strategy framework development process, which might be of use also for other countries in transition in the Central Asian region. The two documents presented in this Fisheries and Aquaculture Ci rcular are considered final versions and cleared as such by the Ministry of Agriculture and Water Resources of the Republic of Uzbekistan. They are also available in the Russian language from the ministry. The document entitled “Review of the current status of inland capture fisheries and aquaculture in the Republic of Uzbekistan” is presented in Part I of this circular. The document entitled the “Conception of aquaculture and capture fisheries development of the Republic of Uzbekistan , 2008–2016” is contained in Part II.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (series)
    Fisheries and aquaculture in Tajikistan: review and policy framework 2013
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    The fishery sector currently plays a minor role in development of the rural economy of Tajikistan. Its contribution to the country’s Gross National Product was in recent years less than 0.1 percent. Despite the availability of extensive water resources (ponds, reservoirs, lakes, rivers and channels), fish production has fallen from 4 000 tonnes in 1991 to 214 tonnes in 2006. As a consequence, fish consumption per capita has decreased to a level less than 0.5kg, compared to 3kg at the end of the 1980s. Fishery in Tajikistan started with the construction of Farkhadskiy and Kayrakkum reservoirs in the north of the Republic. Aquaculture development received the most attention. In the early 1960s the government carried out a large-scale program of fish farming development. Under this programme aquaculture farms with a total area of about 2 500 hectares (ha) were established. Production technologies included semi-intensive culture and extensive polyculture of carp in earthen ponds. Specie s cultured were common carp Cyprinus carpio carpio, silver carp Hypophthalmichthys molitrix, bighead carp H. nobilis, and grass carp Ctenopharyngodon idella. Aquaculture provided 70-80 percent of the marketed fish before independence. After independence the reform process of the economy led to a partly privatized fishery sector. The poorly managed privatization process negatively affected the fishery and aquaculture sector. Combined with a general economic crisis, breaking of communications an d dramatic decrease in trade with the former Soviet Union states, limited availability of commercial fish feeds and hatchery equipment, limited investment in research, training and education, the privatization process can be considered disastrous for the sector. At present the sector is slowly recovering but the severe winter in 2007/2008 (the coldest in over 25 years) set back the sector’s growth. The principal fishery sector governing body is the Ministry of Agriculture (MoA). Scientific rese arch is mainly carried out by the Department of Ichthyology and Hydrobiology of the Institute of Zoology and Parasitology under the Academy of Science, of Tajikistan and the Faculty of Ichthyology and Physiology of farm livestock of the Tajik Agrarian University. The MoA, recognizing the potential contribution of the capture fisheries and aquaculture sectors to rural poverty alleviation, achievement of food security and generation of alternative employment, has started to support actively the rehabilitation of the sector. Acknowledging that the country cannot develop the sector on its own, the MoA took a leading role in the initiation of regional collaboration, by organizing the first Regional Intergovernmental meeting to initiate the establishment of a Central Asian Fisheries Organization in November 2008. This FAO Fisheries and Aquaculture Circular has three main aims. First, it is intended to inform those interested in fisheries and aquaculture in Tajikistan about the current situation with regard to fishery resources and their utilization in the country. Second, it attempts to provide background information in support of the national sectoral policy and strategy formulation process. Thirdly, it may serve as guidance for future interventions by the government and donors in support of the sustainable development and management of the sector.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Meeting
    Plenary Meeting of the Eurasian Soil Partnership, Report. Bishkek, Kyrgyz Republic, 29 February - 2 March 2016 2016
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    The Eurasian region is located in Eastern Europe, Central Asia and Caucasus and includes Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Moldova, Russian Federation, Tajikistan, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Ukraine and Uzbekistan. The Eurasian region is diverse in terms of its climatic conditions, soils, flora, fauna, land use and human activities. Soil degradation is driven by complex variables, including climatic factors, economic factors, institutional and national policies. Soil degr adation and problem soils are a serious process that is affecting the soils in the region through various processes, in particular: salinization, erosion, soil organic matter, nutrient and biodiversity depletion, and soil compaction. The Eurasian Soil Partnership focal points and representatives of 13 countries from Eurasia (Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyz Republic, Moldova, Russian Federation, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Turkey, Ukraine and Uzbekistan), as well as rep resentatives of ICARDA, ICBA, CIMMYT, GIZ and the Kyrgyz Soil Science Community participated in the Eurasian Soil Partnership workshop, held in Bishkek, Kyrgyz Republic from 29 February till 2 March 2016. The workshop was convened under the International Forum on Eurasian Food Security and Nutrition Network and Eurasian Soil Partnership jointly organized by ECFS, FAO, the World Bank and GFAR. The workshop was organized around plenary presentations (in particular on Major Activities of ECFS an d its international partners on food security and sustainable soil management (2013-2015)) and plenary discussions for ECFS collaborative research and educational programs, network activities and future directions. Further discussions held on parallel sessions for Barriers preventing Sustainable Soil Management (SSM) application and recommended SSM practices, Identification of appropriate sustainable soil management practices and systems at regional and national levels and Adoption of Final Docu ments. Under the moderation of Chair of Dr. Hukmatullo Ahmadov, the Challenges of GSP, the outcomes of the EASP activities in 2014-2015, the Introduction to the Implementation Plan for EASP and Assessments of the barriers and shortcomings preventing the adoption of SSM practices at the national level by Eurasian region countries was discussed and was adopted to be included in Bishkek COMMUNIQUÉ as the Summary of barriers to sustainable soil management in Eurasia and possible ways of overcomin g them. Under the moderation of Vice-Chair Dr Gulchekhra Khasankhanova, the working plan 2016-2017 was discussed at an open discussion and was adopted to be included in Bishkek COMMUNIQUÉ as the Workplan 2016-2017. Finally, under the moderation of GSP Executive Secretary Ronald Vargas, the work of the Eurasian Soil Partnership focal points and representatives of 13 countries from Eurasia was summarized via the Bishkek COMMUNIQUÉ (please see Annex 1) which was accompanied with a “Workplan 2016- 2017” (please see Annex 2) and “Summary of barriers to sustainable soil management in Eurasia and possible ways of overcoming 5 them” (please see Annex 3). The text of the Bishkek COMMUNIQUÉ adopted and signed by all Focal Points was presented on the Concluding Panel Discussion of International Forum on Eurasian Food Security and Nutrition Network and Eurasian Soil Partnership.

Users also downloaded

Showing related downloaded files

No results found.