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Safety practices related to small fishing vessel stability.










Gudmundsson, A. Safety practices related to small fishing vessel stability. FAO Fisheries and Aquaculture Technical Paper. No. 517. Rome, FAO. 2009. 54p.



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  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (stand-alone)
    Safety of fishermen (Tamil version) 2007
    “Safety First” is the slogan that the crew-members of any fishing vessel should keep in mind. “Safety” must be given top priority. Appropriate safety measures will save lives, protect vessels from damage, prevent serious injuries, protect the environment, and help maintain the fishing industry in a profitable manner. The owners, operators and skippers of all fishing vessels have a responsibility to train their crewmembers on “safety”. This manual provides a list of possible accidents t hat may occur onboard fishing vessels and useful tips and courses of action that may be taken in order to keep those accidents from happening. This manual has been compiled primarily for vessels of less than 24 metres in length where the skipper does not hold a certificate of competency or has limited vocational training.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (stand-alone)
    Safety of fishermen 2007
    “Safety First” is the slogan that the crew-members of any fishing vessel should keep in mind. “Safety” must be given top priority. Appropriate safety measures will save lives, protect vessels from damage, prevent serious injuries, protect the environment, and help maintain the fishing industry in a profitable manner. The owners, operators and skippers of all fishing vessels have a responsibility to train their crewmembers on “safety”. This manual provides a list of possible accidents t hat may occur onboard fishing vessels and useful tips and courses of action that may be taken in order to keep those accidents from happening. This manual has been compiled primarily for vessels of less than 24 metres in length where the skipper does not hold a certificate of competency or has limited vocational training.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Project
    Training in Sea Safety Development
    Training in Sea Safety Development Programmes, India, IND/6712
    1998
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    The Consultant travelled to New Delhi, Kakinada and Visakhapatnam for discussions with fishermen, fishing boat owners, boatbuilders, staff from the Kakinada Port Office, Marine Department in Visakhapatnam, Fisheries Department, Fisheries Training Institute (CFTI) and F AO, on questions of fishing vessel safety. During the cyclone in November 1996, 110 trawlers and 569 crew members were lost. Only the 10-12 m multi-day trawlers were caught at sea in the cyclone since the smaller boats were not ou t fishing due to bad weather. It was noted that the safety equipment required in the "Merchant Shipping Act" is not carried when the boats go fishing. Concrete steps are recommended to improve the safety of the fishing vessels, including lashing down of hatch covers and providing larger scuppers in the bulwark, together with better training of the crew in dealing with heavy weather. The lifejackets supplied in India with cotton cover and kapok floatation are outdated. None of the crew on the fis hing boats or the instructors of the CFTI knew how to tie on the life jackets properly. The Syllabus of the CFTI puts too little emphasis on training for heavy weather boat handling and safety drills. Two training courses aimed at different levels of participants were held in Kakinada. A prototype of a rigid lifefloat for 8-10 men was made in a FRP boatbuilding yard in kakinada and demonstrated in the fishing harbour. The life float is designed to be carried on top of the wheelhouse and will inc rease the chances of survival of the crew and the probability of being seen by search boats and aeroplanes. The scantlings of the wooden trawlers built in Kakinada are considerably below what , is considered to be the minimum in other countries. This increases the possibility of Youndering in heavy weather due to leaks, especially on older boats. Poor workmanship and scantlings were also seen in FRP boats. Many of the FRP boats have no, or inadequate, buoyancy compartments to keep the boats aflo at if a sudden leak occurs. A tender specification was prepared for the supply of 12 diesel engines by the project for installation in Navas.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (stand-alone)
    Safety of fishermen (Tamil version) 2007
    “Safety First” is the slogan that the crew-members of any fishing vessel should keep in mind. “Safety” must be given top priority. Appropriate safety measures will save lives, protect vessels from damage, prevent serious injuries, protect the environment, and help maintain the fishing industry in a profitable manner. The owners, operators and skippers of all fishing vessels have a responsibility to train their crewmembers on “safety”. This manual provides a list of possible accidents t hat may occur onboard fishing vessels and useful tips and courses of action that may be taken in order to keep those accidents from happening. This manual has been compiled primarily for vessels of less than 24 metres in length where the skipper does not hold a certificate of competency or has limited vocational training.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (stand-alone)
    Safety of fishermen 2007
    “Safety First” is the slogan that the crew-members of any fishing vessel should keep in mind. “Safety” must be given top priority. Appropriate safety measures will save lives, protect vessels from damage, prevent serious injuries, protect the environment, and help maintain the fishing industry in a profitable manner. The owners, operators and skippers of all fishing vessels have a responsibility to train their crewmembers on “safety”. This manual provides a list of possible accidents t hat may occur onboard fishing vessels and useful tips and courses of action that may be taken in order to keep those accidents from happening. This manual has been compiled primarily for vessels of less than 24 metres in length where the skipper does not hold a certificate of competency or has limited vocational training.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Project
    Training in Sea Safety Development
    Training in Sea Safety Development Programmes, India, IND/6712
    1998
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    The Consultant travelled to New Delhi, Kakinada and Visakhapatnam for discussions with fishermen, fishing boat owners, boatbuilders, staff from the Kakinada Port Office, Marine Department in Visakhapatnam, Fisheries Department, Fisheries Training Institute (CFTI) and F AO, on questions of fishing vessel safety. During the cyclone in November 1996, 110 trawlers and 569 crew members were lost. Only the 10-12 m multi-day trawlers were caught at sea in the cyclone since the smaller boats were not ou t fishing due to bad weather. It was noted that the safety equipment required in the "Merchant Shipping Act" is not carried when the boats go fishing. Concrete steps are recommended to improve the safety of the fishing vessels, including lashing down of hatch covers and providing larger scuppers in the bulwark, together with better training of the crew in dealing with heavy weather. The lifejackets supplied in India with cotton cover and kapok floatation are outdated. None of the crew on the fis hing boats or the instructors of the CFTI knew how to tie on the life jackets properly. The Syllabus of the CFTI puts too little emphasis on training for heavy weather boat handling and safety drills. Two training courses aimed at different levels of participants were held in Kakinada. A prototype of a rigid lifefloat for 8-10 men was made in a FRP boatbuilding yard in kakinada and demonstrated in the fishing harbour. The life float is designed to be carried on top of the wheelhouse and will inc rease the chances of survival of the crew and the probability of being seen by search boats and aeroplanes. The scantlings of the wooden trawlers built in Kakinada are considerably below what , is considered to be the minimum in other countries. This increases the possibility of Youndering in heavy weather due to leaks, especially on older boats. Poor workmanship and scantlings were also seen in FRP boats. Many of the FRP boats have no, or inadequate, buoyancy compartments to keep the boats aflo at if a sudden leak occurs. A tender specification was prepared for the supply of 12 diesel engines by the project for installation in Navas.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (stand-alone)
    Safety of fishermen (Tamil version) 2007
    “Safety First” is the slogan that the crew-members of any fishing vessel should keep in mind. “Safety” must be given top priority. Appropriate safety measures will save lives, protect vessels from damage, prevent serious injuries, protect the environment, and help maintain the fishing industry in a profitable manner. The owners, operators and skippers of all fishing vessels have a responsibility to train their crewmembers on “safety”. This manual provides a list of possible accidents t hat may occur onboard fishing vessels and useful tips and courses of action that may be taken in order to keep those accidents from happening. This manual has been compiled primarily for vessels of less than 24 metres in length where the skipper does not hold a certificate of competency or has limited vocational training.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (stand-alone)
    Safety of fishermen 2007
    “Safety First” is the slogan that the crew-members of any fishing vessel should keep in mind. “Safety” must be given top priority. Appropriate safety measures will save lives, protect vessels from damage, prevent serious injuries, protect the environment, and help maintain the fishing industry in a profitable manner. The owners, operators and skippers of all fishing vessels have a responsibility to train their crewmembers on “safety”. This manual provides a list of possible accidents t hat may occur onboard fishing vessels and useful tips and courses of action that may be taken in order to keep those accidents from happening. This manual has been compiled primarily for vessels of less than 24 metres in length where the skipper does not hold a certificate of competency or has limited vocational training.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Project
    Training in Sea Safety Development
    Training in Sea Safety Development Programmes, India, IND/6712
    1998
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    The Consultant travelled to New Delhi, Kakinada and Visakhapatnam for discussions with fishermen, fishing boat owners, boatbuilders, staff from the Kakinada Port Office, Marine Department in Visakhapatnam, Fisheries Department, Fisheries Training Institute (CFTI) and F AO, on questions of fishing vessel safety. During the cyclone in November 1996, 110 trawlers and 569 crew members were lost. Only the 10-12 m multi-day trawlers were caught at sea in the cyclone since the smaller boats were not ou t fishing due to bad weather. It was noted that the safety equipment required in the "Merchant Shipping Act" is not carried when the boats go fishing. Concrete steps are recommended to improve the safety of the fishing vessels, including lashing down of hatch covers and providing larger scuppers in the bulwark, together with better training of the crew in dealing with heavy weather. The lifejackets supplied in India with cotton cover and kapok floatation are outdated. None of the crew on the fis hing boats or the instructors of the CFTI knew how to tie on the life jackets properly. The Syllabus of the CFTI puts too little emphasis on training for heavy weather boat handling and safety drills. Two training courses aimed at different levels of participants were held in Kakinada. A prototype of a rigid lifefloat for 8-10 men was made in a FRP boatbuilding yard in kakinada and demonstrated in the fishing harbour. The life float is designed to be carried on top of the wheelhouse and will inc rease the chances of survival of the crew and the probability of being seen by search boats and aeroplanes. The scantlings of the wooden trawlers built in Kakinada are considerably below what , is considered to be the minimum in other countries. This increases the possibility of Youndering in heavy weather due to leaks, especially on older boats. Poor workmanship and scantlings were also seen in FRP boats. Many of the FRP boats have no, or inadequate, buoyancy compartments to keep the boats aflo at if a sudden leak occurs. A tender specification was prepared for the supply of 12 diesel engines by the project for installation in Navas.

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