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Beekeeping: How to keep bees and process honey








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    Farmer Level Tech - Note for Beginner Beekeeping 2013
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    In May 2007, the National Forum on Forests (UNFF) adopted the Non-Legally Binding Instrument on All Types of Forest (NLB), which is commonly called the “Forest Instrument”. This significant international consensus was reached to boost the implementation of sustainable forest management (SFM), and thus to maintain and enhance the economic and environmental values of all types of forests, for the benefit of present and future generation. Most specifically, the Forest Instrument is to: () Strengthen political commitment and actions at all levels to effectively implement SFM, (ii) Enhance the contribution of forests to the achievement of the international agreed development goals including the MDG, and (iii) Provide a framework for national action and international cooperation. The overall objective of the project is “to support Liberia, Nicaragua and the Philippines, on a demonstration basis, to move forward in the implementation of the Non-Legally Binding Instrume nt on all types of forest”. Towards this end, an agro forestry component under the Project is providing intensive training to rural communities in three Counties, including Nimba, Grand Gedeh , and River Gee respectively in the areas of beekeeping and snail farming and total of 60 farmers were trained. Beekeeping is a traditional activity in Liberia and the rich vegetation of the country offers great potentials for beekeeping. It is an activity that can be carried out both by man and women as an additional income generating activity. It is not a labour-intensive activity and honey harvesting is generally undertaken during the lean season when demand for agricultural labour is not high. Land does not need to be owned to be able to practice beekeeping because hives can be hung in trees in the forest. The products of the beehive, among which honey is the most known can be consumed by the family, sold on the market, processed for value adding or stored for when the household needs cash. Beehive products can also be used as medicines. Training people in sustainable beekeeping practices does not only contribute to the food security of the households, it can also raise awareness among the beekeepers about the importance of sustainable forest management. This training manual aims at providing the basic skills necessary to practice small scale sustainable beekeeping with topbar hives and highlight the essential role that bees play in nature and food production. Through this publication, FAO and the Forest Development authority of Liberia (FDA) want to contribute to the income generation and food security of the Liberian farmers.
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    Book (series)
    Responsible use of antimicrobials in beekeeping 2021
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    These guidelines focus on responsible use of antimicrobials in sustainable apiculture. Following a one-health approach, they aim to protect not only honey bees, but even human health (e.g. reducing the risks of residues in hive products and preventing development of antimicrobial resistance) and the environment. The best way to reach this goal is to prevent and to guarantee the early detection of clinical cases of the main honey bee diseases through the application of good beekeeping practices and biosecurity measures. And when medicines are needed for the honey bees, specific indication is provided to reduce their impact: choosing medicines with a low environmental impact, using them timely, prudently and following the due instructions. It is imperative to apply only those active ingredients that are registered for the honey bees and that are ideally prescribed by a veterinarian. Antibiotics should always be avoided as much as possible to reduce risks of residues in hive products and to prevent risks of antimicrobial resistance. Prudent and limited use of antimicrobials in beekeeping benefits the quality of bee products and the safety of surrounding ecosystems, while also slowing development of antimicrobial resistance, which is a widespread issue affecting multiple sectors. Finally, in this document, for the first time, a progressive management pathway (PMP) has been devised for honey bees, as well as surveys were created to assess current beekeeping practices and general awareness of topical issues such as AMR. The overall aim of these guidelines is to provide information of current challenges within the sector and orientate towards sustainable production and honey bee colony health.
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    Book (series)
    Visual manual on good beekeeping practices for small-scale beekeepers in Africa 2021
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    This manual is a visual, practical document on good beekeeping practices for sustainable small-scale beekeepers in Africa. It has been designed to serve as a beekeeping training tool and is a concise, practical reference document. The manual opens with an illustrated story of the damaging effect of certain practices adopted when collecting wild honey (honey hunting) and aims to spark interest among readers on how to harvest honey more sustainably. The second section presents the reader with the main beekeeping equipment and explains how the tools can be used to keep healthy bees and harvest quality honey. It ends with an overview of good beekeeping practices that will help the beekeeper produce good honey in a sustainable manner. Rather than recommend a specific type of hive, the manual provides necessary information that will help beekeepers determine which type is best suited to their local conditions. The many illustrations included in the manual aim to help beekeepers make their own versions of the equipment that are tailored to local needs.

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