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Emergency Support to Fisher Folks to Resume Sustainable Marine Fishing affected by Cyclone Idai - TCP/MOZ/3702








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    Booklet
    Foundations for rebuilding seed systems post Cyclone Idai – Achievements and insights from project implementation.
    Malawi, Mozambique and Zimbabwe
    2023
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    When Cyclones Idai and Kenneth made landfall in Southern Africa in March and April 2019 respectively, the consequences were devastating for farmers, who lost local seed reserves including crop wild relatives and crops ready for harvest. The cyclones and related floods affected more than 3.8 million people in Southern Africa and destroyed nearly 800 000 hectares of standing crops in Malawi, Mozambique and Zimbabwe. Next to emergency relief efforts on food, health and shelter, the project 'Foundations for rebuilding seed systems post Cyclone Idai: Malawi, Mozambique and Zimbabwe' aimed to improve food and nutrition security and livelihoods in the longer term. In the project, national gene banks and farmers collaborated to rescue, regenerate and return seed to affected communities in Malawi, Mozambique and Zimbabwe, and to strengthen national and regional planning for the protection of local seed systems in the future. The project has been implemented by the International Treaty on Plant Genetic Resources for Food and Agriculture (ITPGRFA) and FAO in partnership with the national gene banks of Malawi, Mozambique and Zimbabwe and was financially supported by the Government of Germany and the Kingdom of Norway. This report summarizes the achievements and insights of the project from September 2019 until September 2022.
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    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    Myanmar: Cyclone Mocha. Urgent call for assistance 2023
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    On 14 May 2023, cyclone Mocha made landfall in Myanmar, accompanied by violent gusts, torrential rainfall and flooding. Mocha caused significant disruption to the lives and livelihoods of more than 40 percent of farming households in Ayeyarwady, Chin, Kachin, Magway and Sagaing, and more than 80 percent in Rakhine. The climate-induced disaster struck some of the most vulnerable rural communities at a time when they were already grappling with a growing food security crisis. In line with Cyclone Mocha Flash Appeal, the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) aims to scale up emergency livelihoods support to the most vulnerable rural households in the affected areas. The document provides an overview of the potential impact of Mocha on agriculture and food security as well as FAO's planned response and urgent funding requirements.
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    Northern Mozambique | Response overview – January 2022
    Cabo Delgado, Nampula and Niassa
    2022
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    According to the latest Integrated Food Security Phase Classification (IPC) analysis, nearly 1.9 million people are experiencing high levels of acute food insecurity (IPC Phase 3 or above) in Mozambique, including almost 40 000 people in emergency (IPC Phase 4). About 71 percent (1.3 million people) of these people are in four provinces: Cabo Delgado, Niassa, Nampula and Zambézia. The main cause of food insecurity is the ongoing conflict in Cabo Delgado and its spillover effects. The number of people displaced by the crisis has risen sharply from 110 000 in March 2021 to over 820 000 in December 2021, according to government estimates. Other key drivers include: the shortage of rainfall or irregular rains in parts of Gaza, Inhambane, Manica, Maputo, Nampula and Tete provinces; increasing food prices; and the impact of necessary restrictive measures to confine the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. FAO continues to take a leadership role in the agriculture livelihood response across Mozambique, including in the most remote areas in the north. This includes investing in the agriculture sector (crops, fisheries, livestock and forestry) to restore livelihoods and enhance food security and nutrition for the most vulnerable internally displaced people (IDP) and host community populations. The timely provision of seeds, tools and technical assistance and planting of crops produces enough nutritious food to guarantee self-sufficiency for three to six months for an average household of five. This document provides an overview of FAO's humanitarian response in Mozambique in 2021 and outlines key priorities for 2022.

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