Thumbnail Image

Nursery Rearing of Tiger Shrimp Post - Larvae in West Bengal, India -BOBP/WP/86








Also available in:
No results found.

Related items

Showing items related by metadata.

  • Thumbnail Image
    Project
    Cage Nursery Rearing of Shrimp and Prawn Fry in Bangladesh - BOBP/WP/92 1994
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    The shrimp culture industry of Bangladesh depends on catches of the wild fry of tiger shrimp. Employment as fry-catchers has been generated for thousands of rural poor. But the marketing system is not well developed and high fry mortality occurs due to poor handling. The growing freshwater prawn farming sector, however, continues to demand increasing quantities of large juveniles. This report, based on field trials from 1990 to 1993, describes the results of cage nurseryculture trials with b oth tiger shrmip (Penaeus monodon) and giant freshwater prawn (Macrobrachium rosenbergii) fry. It was thought that fry-catchers would be able to increase their earnings through sales of nursed post-larvae and juveniles. The survival of nursed post-larvae in the distribution system would also be increased. However, it is unlikely that tiger shrimp fry nursing can be made profitable. On the other hand, cage culture of a combination of hatchery-reared post-larvae and wild-caught fry of the freshwat er prawn would be profitable. An NGO played an important role in the subproject by implementing technical trials and organizing and supporting participating fisherfolk groups.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Project
    Market Study of Tiger Shrimp Fry in West Bengal, India -BOBP/WP/87 1993
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    Rice-fish polyculture in bheries (enclosed paddyfields) has been a tradition in the West Bengal (India) delta. Fish are seeded naturally with the water let into the paddyfields. With the growing shrimp export market, shrimp culture in the bheries has proved economically attractive and the supply of tiger shrimp fry to the bheries is, now, a burgeoning business is West Bengal. The Bay of Bengal Programme (BOBP), at the request of the Government of West Bengal, studied the problems connected wi th the supply of tiger shrimp fry to the bheries. The problems were seen as a constraint to the development of the mainly export-oriented shrimp culture industry. BOBP looked into both natural collection and hatchery-reared supply of shrimp fry. It also helped the West Bengal Department of Fisheries to establish a small hatchery at Digha and it worked with some of the fry catchers of Medinipur District through a local NGO. The study of all these activities as well as the marketing process was seen as a step towards a better understanding of the existing tiger shrimp fry market and the fisherfolk involved in it. This, it was hoped, would lead to an elimination of some, if not all, the problems associated with the business. The BOBP study was undertaken under the ‘Small-scale Fisherfolk Communities’ project (GCP/RAS/l18/MUL).
  • Thumbnail Image
    Project
    Pen Culture of Shrimp in Chilaw, Sri Lanka - BOBP/WP/60 1989
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    This paper describes trials with pen culture of tiger prawns, carried out between 1986 and 1988 in Merawela village in the Chilaw lagoon of Sri Lanka. The trials were conducted by the Bay of Bengal Programme (BOBP) in association with the Ministry of Fisheries, Government of Sri Lanka, and the local Social DevelopmentOrganization, an agency established by the Ministry of Fisheries to encourage development schemes in fishing villages. The Chilaw pen culture subproject, and this paper which repo rts on it, have been sponsored by the BOBP’s project “Small-Scale Fisherfolk Communities in the Bay of Bengal” (GCP/RAS/118/MUL). The project is jointly funded by SIDA (Swedish International Development Authority) and DANIDA (Danish International Development Agency) and executed by FAO (Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations). It covers seven countries bordering the Bay of Bengal, Bangladesh, India, Indonesia, Malaysia, Maldives, Sri Lanka and Thailand. The main goals of the pro ject, which commenced in 1987, are to develop demonstrate and promote appropriate technologies and methodologies to improve the conditions of small-scale fisherfolk communities in member countries.

Users also downloaded

Showing related downloaded files

No results found.