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How do community forestry principles influence access to collective land and forest resources? A comparative analysis between Indonesia and Cameroon

Le XVe Congrès forestier mondial, du 2 au 6 mai 2022









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    Article
    Contribution of forest resources to the livelihood of adjacent communities around forest concessions: The case of Eyumojock area, southwest region of Cameroon
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
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    The expectation of a healthy and buoyant future of the forests remains a mirage until community dependence on the forest is effectively compensated. Forest communities depend greatly on the forest for food, income, shelter and medicine, and will always agitate once their livelihood is greatly threatened. Objectively quantifying and sufficient compensation of community dependence on the forest is a key challenge faced while trying to balance forest use with conservation. This paper quantifies livelihood strategies for rural households, assesses the proportion of household income obtained from the forest, and explore the relationship between the quantities of NTFPs exploited and the household non-forest income in the Southwest Region of Cameroon. 471 households in Eyumojock area were sampled using semi-structured questionnaires and PRA tools. Descriptive and inferential (OLS) statistics were used for data analysis. The results reveal Agriculture (Cocoa, Plantain, Cassava), Forest (Irvingia, Bushmeat, Gnetum), Animal rearing (Pigs, Goats and Poultry) and Petty-trade as diverse income sources in order of priority (75%,17%, 1% and 7%). With a Gross annual household income in the range 420 – 51,410 $ and mean gross annual household income of 5,792 $, 81.7% of households have a gross annual income in the lower ranges of 3,636 - 7,272 $. Increase in the quantities of (Irvingia sp) Bush mango (QIV),and (Gnetum sp) Eru (QER) collected will increase household income from non - forest sources (GINF). On the other hand, increase in gross non-forest income (GINF) will reduce the quantities of Garcinia kola, Irvingia sp, Gnetum africanum, Ricinodendron heudelotii, Afrostyrax lepidophyllus, Piper nigrum L and Bushmeat significantly contribute to gross household income (p<0.05), with the quantity of Bushmeat having the greatest influence. Focusing on education and skill-building programs that will offer locals better employment opportunities, improve crop production and enhance the domestication of major NTFPs is a better option forsustainable forest management efforts. Keywords: Agriculture, bushmeat, forest concession, household income, non-timber forest product. ID: 3490013
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    Article
    Community-based investment to address deforestation and forest degradation in West Kalimantan, Indonesia
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
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    West Kalimantan is the province with high forest cover but contributing high emission from high deforestation and forest degradation. FIP-1 project targets in reducing emission from deforestation and forest degradation (REDD+). Achievement on reducing emission will contribute the Indonesia’s Nationally Determined Contribution (NDC). The project has two themes, forest management intervention and community investment to increase their income. A log-frame and theory of change is applied to measure the impacts. Baseline data was setup through data collection and analysis. Stakeholder analysis was carried out to design institution arrangement and capacity building program. Economic benefit was measured at local community. Rate of deforestation and degradation was measured using a GIS tool. During the period of 2018-2020, total project investment is US $6.5 million. FIP-1 project has invested a total amount of USD 4.1 million for the livelihood improvement program, and USD 2.4 million for the sustainable forest management. Total emission reduction during the period of 2018-2020 is 1.02 TCO2-e. FMU (Forest Management Unit) is the important party in this achievement and community involvement is a key success in this investment. Community income has increased by 50% in June 2021 (compare to the baseline in 2016). A total 63% investment has been allocated for livelihood improvement program, while 36% of the investment was allocated for forest management intervention. From this investment, a total of 1.02 TCO2e of emission has been reduced. An effective REDD+ program will require involvement from FMU and community as active players. Keywords: Forest Investment Program, West Kalimantan, climate change, forestry ID: 3488259
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    An assessment of community involvement in the Kilum/Ijim forest management project, Mount Oku Region, Cameroon
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
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    The increasing dependence on forests for livelihood sustainability to rural communities, has put forests under enormous pressure and threat. In addressing these problem, most governments are involving local communities in conservation programs. This study is focused on the level and extent of local institutions’ involvement after forest management rights were devolved to the communities in the Mount Oku Forest Region. The institutional analysis and development framework were used to study the institutional conditions for effective conservation strategies. The study was guided by; reasons for the creation of the Forest management Project (FMP); level and extent of community involvement; and status of the forest before and after the FMP. Parameters for measuring the level of involvement included: organizing meetings, attending meetings, decision making, participatory project investigation, negotiation, implementation, monitoring and evaluation, project funding, enacting forest protection laws and direct employment; each activity assigned a score of 10%. The extent of involvement included: forest protection, forest utilization, forest greening and forest monitoring; each assigned a score of 25%. Based on the existence of frontline and secondary villages, five Forest Management Institution (FMI) were randomly selected from the tribes that make up the Kilum/ Ijim Forest Project. Selected Participatory Rural Appraisal tools, and FMI registers were employed to obtain relevant data. The population test and Wilcoxon sign rank test revealed a significantly high level of local community involvement in FMP after implementation (t = 31.81, d.f =543, P=0.00; significantly high extent of community involvement in the FMP after its implementation (t= 15.88, d.f =543, P=0.00) and a remarkable difference in forest status before and after the creation of the KIFP ( Z = 12.00,P=0.000).The study concludes that, effective decentralization and devolution of forest management rights substantiate communities’ development needs, regenerates forests and ensures their stability. Keywords: Level of involvement, Extent of involvement, forest regeneration, forest status. ID: 3476570

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