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Fertilizer distribution and credit schemes for small-scale farmers









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    Fishery credit in Indonesia
    Field document no. 1
    1982
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    Indonesia ranks among the world's top 15 fishing nations with its yearly output of 1.8 million tons. Its fisheries, essentially of a small-scale nature, support the living of about 5 percent of its population and supply more than half of the country's low intake of animal protein, as well as making a positive contribution to the balance of payments. Adequate availability of credit is a requisite for a sustained growth of the fisheries sector, which offers scope for development in both marine and inland waters. Institutional, noninstitutional and private sources of funding available to smallscale fishermen in Java are analysed and their complementary function is described in this report. Inadequacies on the institutional side, such as insufficient total funding, a long time-lag between application for loan and its disbursement and conditions for granting a loan still leave ample space for usurious private moneylenders. The report focuses on credit granted by institutional sources. Mai n constraints are analysed, such as inadequate knowledge of the credit scheme by fishermen, lack of coordination between the head office of the Bank Rakyat Indonesia (BRI) and its branch offices, lack of follow-up action on the part of the loan granting institution, which results in low rates of repayment, high administrative cost and so on. Recommendations include a strengthening of the extension service (a project proposal is attached); a more vital functioning of fisheries cooperatives in in stitutional credit, coupled with the upgrading of their marketing infrastructure and facilities; implementation of socioeconomic studies concerning economic impacts rendered by credit programmes; better coordination between the Directorate General of Fisheries and Cooperative Department at all levels of administration and management; implementation of feasibility studies by BRI prior to the disbursement of loans; compilation of a manual on lending policies; project evaluation and appraisal, and utilization of agriculture training facilities for fisheries extension officers
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    Increasing Quantity and Quality of Rice for Small-Scale Farmers in Myanmar - TCP/MYA/3504 2019
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    Rice is the staple food of the people of Myanmar and rice farming contributes significantly to the livelihoods of the majority of the rural population, which constitutes 70 percent of the national total. Although rice is widely grown across Myanmar, significant quantitative and qualitative post harvest losses occur in rice, owing to improper practices during post-harvest operations such as harvesting, threshing, cleaning, drying, storage, and milling. Farmers have traditionally been reluctant to adopt science-based harvesting, post-harvest handling, processing and packaging practices due to a lack of awareness and inadequate training. In this context, effective methods were identified to improve harvesting, post-harvest handling, storage, processing, packaging and marketing of rice for farmers in Myanmar, in particular in the target areas of Nay Pyi Taw and Ayeyarwady regions.
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    Support to the Promotion of Conservation Agriculture and Integrated Pest Management for Sustained Soil Fertility and Productivity - TCP/GHA/3701 2023
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    The degradation of soils, which are the foundation of agrifood systems, is alarming in sub Saharan Africa, which is already facing continued population growth that increases pressure on scarce natural resources Soil in Ghana is becoming low in nutrients, fragile and exposed to adverse natural and environmental pressures In addition, unsustainable farming systems on marginal lands and the overuse of chemical fertilizers and misuse of pesticides have led to declining soil fertility and contamination of the natural environment, rendering soils unproductive and negatively affecting livelihoods Smallholder agriculture, especially in the northern part of the country, is characterized by natural production with low access to productive assets, information and technical skills, low level of implementation of modern technologies and mechanization, small farm sizes, lack of productive infrastructures and rural finance institutions Moreover, subsistence farmers are the most exposed to climate change and price volatility Conservation Agriculture ( has proven to be a viable approach that contributes to improved and sustainable productivity, environmental protection and climate change adaptation It aims to improve soil productivity and conservation and includes practices that combine integrated management of soil, water and agricultural resources to boost food production Despite the potential benefits, implementation of CA, Integrated Pest Management ( and other Climate Smart Agriculture ( practices by smallholders remains low Previous experience with these types of interventions in Ghana showed a lack of evidence based interventions, know how on appropriate technologies to use and access to appropriate and locally designed tools and affordable equipment Smallholder households were identified as slow adopters of CA There is also the need to introduce the benefits of IPM to farmers to minimize the use of chemicals in foods As such, this project aimed to improve production systems and strengthen resilient livelihoods by using a climate smart approach as well as dealing with issues affecting agriculture management of natural resources The project targeted smallholder food crop farm families who are the most vulnerable with limited access to markets and credit The issues to be addressed were the degradation of natural resources due to inappropriate farming practices and population growth, improper use of agrochemicals in farming, a lack of organizational capacity to deal with climate change impacts at the community leveI inadequate access to resources and negligible or no access to information on good agricultural practices and climate change impacts.

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