Thumbnail Image

The changing role of multinational companies in the global banana trade







Also available in:
No results found.

Related items

Showing items related by metadata.

  • Thumbnail Image
    Document
    Women in the Banana Export Industry. Regional Report on Latin America.
    Working paper. Series for the World Banana Forum.
    2015
    Also available in:

    Women in the Banana Export Industry Regional Report on Latin America is part of a global report on the economic aspects of gender issues in the banana sector. It is based on research conducted in Colombia, Ecuador, Honduras, Guatemala and Nicaragua with a primary focus on the situation for hired labour and analyses levels of women’s employment in the region and the key challenges for women workers. The report will inform the work of the World Banana Forum1. The average proportion of women employ ed in the Latin American banana industry is 12.5%, although this varies within and between countries. A key reason for this low rate of women's employment in the sector is the limited access of women to the whole range of work tasks on the plantation. Women tend to be restricted to work in the 'more controlled environment' of the packing shed in part due to the gender stereotyping of women. Many field tasks are perceived to be too technically difficult or too physically demanding for women to un dertake but tend to be better paid. Women are viewed primarily as domestic actors and childcare providers. The occupational health and safety risks for women identified are particularly those related to the effects of agrochemical exposure on reproductive health. Other problems faced by women workers are sexual harassment, discrimination when pregnant, a lack of childcare provision and the additional burdens faced by women managing childcare, domestic duties and in some cases, trade union activi ty. A lack of access to training (in skills required to undertake field tasks) is an obstacle to women accessing employment. It is recommended that women are consulted to assess which tasks they can do and that this learning could inform guidance for employers. The initiatives led by women trade unionists throughout the region are highlighted as some examples of best practice in terms of increasing and improving employment for women. Company practices to improve women’s treatment in the workplac e, such as the only sexual harassment policy in the region (adopted by Chiquita), are also assessed. It is noted that the socio economic impact of the low proportion of women’s employment, especially given the high rate of women as single heads of household, requires analysis. The report concludes by recommending the World Banana Forum as a multi stakeholder environment in which (the Women’s Secretariats of) independent trade unions and companies can work together to develop and share strategies to increase the provision of Decent Work for women in the banana sector.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Article
    Turning threats into opportunities: An analysis of the response of palm oil companies implementing NDPE commitment to NGO complaints
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    Since the early 2010s, several palm oil companies committed to produce and trade palm oil that is termed “no deforestation, no peatland, and no exploitation” (NDPE). Nongovernmental organizations (NGO) are generally supportive of the commitment. However, they remain critical of how the companies implement their commitment. The paper aims to answer the question of “how to do the palm oil companies implementing the NDPE commitment navigate around the complaints of the NGOs?” We applied and adopted the corporate political activity (CPA) concept. Specifically, we used and extended corporate strategies to manage Kneip (2013) protests and Balsiger (2014). We analyzed over 150 complaints of the NGOs to six major palm oil companies from 2014 to 2019. We found that 1) the complaints are related to one or a combination of breaches in deforestation, peatland, and exploitation; 2) the protests are not only addressed to the companies or their subsidiaries but also the third-party suppliers; 3) it generally takes longer to resolve cases related to exploitation than deforestation and peatland. We argue that the companies navigate around the complaints by applying one or a combination of the responses to the NGO complaints. Using the CPA framework, we say that the companies largely apply information and vertical constituent-building strategies to strengthen their supply base to comply with the companies’ NDPE commitment. The implication is that any commitment towards reducing or ending deforestation should consider the importance of respecting communities’ rights. Keywords: Deforestation and forest degradation, Value chain, Partnerships, Policies, Policies ID: 3486658
  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (series)
    Fish marketing and credit in Viet Nam. 2004
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    Since the early 1980s, exports of fish in Viet Nam have increased significantly while the improvement of domestic marketing and utilization of fish have not received sufficient attention. Improving supplies of fish for urban and rural populations, better quality and safety of products and ensuring food security, particularly for disadvantaged and vulnerable parts of the population, are important concerns which were addressed by studies, the findings of which are presented in this repor t. These findings suggest that the domestic consumption of fish in Viet Nam is probably higher than previously assumed. Given the projected strong economic growth over the coming years, it must be expected that local consumer demand will continue to expand. At the same time, the exportoriented fish processing industry will result in an increased demand for raw materials. This substantial future demand for safe and high quality fish products can only be met if efficient marketing arra ngements are in place. The findings of the studies identify a number of constraints in the present domestic fish marketing channels, which form the basis of recommendations for the improvement of the present marketing arrangements. These include the establishment of fish wholesale markets in large urban areas, establishment of well-functioning assembly markets at important fish landing sites, improvement of the legal/regulatory framework for the operations of fish wholesalers, establ ishment of fish market price information systems, promotion of contract farming/ trading systems among fish market operators certified by local authorities, improvement of fisheries statistics systems for better fish market planning, the promotion of a domestic fish market strategy complementing the export-oriented development strategy and the development of a coordination mechanism for the public sector for fish marketing and fish market management. As far as the fish marketing chai n is concerned, it is recommended that governmental and semi-governmental institutions should play an active role in the improvement of the vertical fish marketing chain. Their cooperation with the private-sector stakeholders is requested as capabilities of the private sector to establish well-working cooperation arrangements seem limited and have not (yet) brought the expected benefits. Publicprivate partnership appears to be the key to success. Credit is widely used for financing m arine capture fisheries, particularly offshore fishing and export-oriented fish culture, processing and marketing. State-owned financial institutions play a major role in financing capital expenditure while working capital requirements are mainly met by informal sources of credit. Future investment requirements and credit needs are greater than current availability. In particular, the domestic fish marketing sector, i.e. wholesalers and retailers, so far have only a limited access to credit and this is perceived as an obstacle to the growth and improvement of the sector. In the case of offshore fisheries, the findings suggest that there should not be any further expansion of credit, and future credit support should focus on making the fleet more efficient and sustainable.

Users also downloaded

Showing related downloaded files

No results found.