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African Trypanosomosis Control - Tackling neglected tropical diseases for African development










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    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    Controlling tsetse and trypanosomosis to protect African livestock keepers, public health and farmers’ livelihoods 2019
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    Tsetse-transmitted Trypanosomoses are a family of infectious diseases unique to Africa that are caused by various species of blood parasites. They affect both people (Human African Trypanosomosis – HAT, or sleeping sickness) and animals (African Animal Trypanosomosis – AAT, or nagana), and they occur in 37 sub-Saharan countries over an area of more than 10 million km² – which corresponds approximately to one-third of Africa’s total land area. The infection threatens over 50 million people and at least 50 million cattle. The disease is often neglected by both endemic countries and donors as it mostly affects poor and vulnerable smallholders in rural areas. In the framework of the Programme Against African Trypanosomosis (PAAT), FAO deals with the constraints that Trypanosomoses pose on agricultural production, rural development and food security.
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    The COMBAT project: controlling and progressively minimizing the burden of vector-borne animal trypanosomosis in Africa
    Version 2 (15 August 2022)
    2022
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    Vector-borne diseases affecting livestock have serious impacts in Africa. Trypanosomosis is caused by parasites transmitted by tsetse flies and other blood-sucking Diptera. The animal form of the disease is a scourge for African livestock keepers, is already present in Latin America and Asia, and has the potential to spread further. A human form of the disease also exists, known as human African trypanosomosis or sleeping sickness. Controlling and progressively minimizing the burden of animal trypanosomosis (COMBAT) is a fouryear research and innovation project funded by the European Commission, whose ultimate goal is to reduce the burden of animal trypanosomosis (AT) in Africa. The project builds on the progressive control pathway (PCP), a risk-based, step-wise approach to disease reduction or elimination. COMBAT will strengthen AT control and prevention by improving basic knowledge of AT, developing innovative control tools, reinforcing surveillance, rationalizing control strategies, building capacity, and raising awareness. Knowledge gaps on disease epidemiology, vector ecology and competence, and biological aspects of trypanotolerant livestock will be addressed. Environmentally friendly vector control technologies and more effective and adapted diagnostic tools will be developed. Surveillance will be enhanced by developing information systems, strengthening reporting, and mapping and modelling disease risk in Africa and beyond. The socio-economic burden of AT will be assessed at a range of geographical scales. Guidelines for the PCP and harmonized national control strategies and roadmaps will be developed. Gender equality and ethics will be pivotal in all project activities. The COMBAT project benefits from the expertise of African and European research institutions, national veterinary authorities, and international organizations. The project consortium comprises 21 participants, including a geographically balanced representation from 13 African countries, and it will engage a larger number of AT-affected countries through regional initiatives.
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    FAO-China South-South Cooperation (SSC) global capacity development activity
    Boosting southern partnerships for the progressive control of high-impact animal diseases: Zimbabwe’s successful experience in controlling tsetse-transmitted trypanosomosis
    2020
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    In Zimbabwe, as in all of sub-Saharan Africa, tsetse-transmitted trypanosomosis poses a severe challenge to food security by limiting livestock production and mixed animal–crop agriculture. This transboundary animal disease is characterized by a slow deterioration of health leading to death; it also reduces quality and quantity of meat and milk production and induces abortions. Trypanosomosis also affects humans in the form of the tropical disease better known as ‘sleeping sickness’, which causes sleepiness during the day and insomnia at night, anxiety, and is lethal if untreated. Good practices have been developed and applied in Zimbabwe to reduce or eliminate the burden of African animal trypanosomosis (AAT). The adoption of these good practices was made possible by the strong commitment of the Government of Zimbabwe, a commitment demonstrated in the allocation of adequate human and financial resources for the control of AAT. The FAO-China South-South Cooperation (SSC) Programme has therefore recognized Zimbabwe as a provider country of expertise in this area. This is the first example of innovative approach of partnerships-building to be set-up by the Programme, joining the forces of provider countries from the South and new resource partners, to introduce a truly mutual-learning modality of SSC.

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