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The Shrimp Fry By-catch in West Bengal-BOBP/WP/88








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    The by-Catch from Indian Shrimp Trawlers in the Bay of Bengal-BOBP/WP/68 1991
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    Shrimps are a major foreign exchange earner for India. But in the race for valuable shrimp, the considerable by-catch hauled up with it is, by and large, ignored in parts of the country. This by-catch is almost 90 per cent of the shrimp caught. This report, based principally on work done in 1988, documents work on assessing the volume and composition of shrimp by-catch discarded by trawlers on India’s east coast and identifies the constraints to its improved utilization. At the time this stud y was undertaken, the provisional estimate of by-catch discards was approximately 100,000 t/a year. Though the numbers have changed since, the loss of by-catch continues to be substantial off this coast. Consequently, more detailed work has followed in specific areas, using this work as a basis. The study of shrimp by-catch and this report, which documents the work done, have been sponsored by the Bay of Bengal Programme’s (BOBP’s) Post-Harvest Fisheries Project. This project has been executed by the Natural Resources Institute (NRI), U.K. and has been funded by the Overseas Development Administration (ODA) of the United Kingdom. During the work the best available experts were engaged and consulted. Besides the BOBP and NRI staff, they included counterparts and fishermen, A. Seetharamaswamy in Vishakhapatnam, and Roger Kullberg who provided invaluable assistance with data collection.
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    Market Study of Tiger Shrimp Fry in West Bengal, India -BOBP/WP/87 1993
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    Rice-fish polyculture in bheries (enclosed paddyfields) has been a tradition in the West Bengal (India) delta. Fish are seeded naturally with the water let into the paddyfields. With the growing shrimp export market, shrimp culture in the bheries has proved economically attractive and the supply of tiger shrimp fry to the bheries is, now, a burgeoning business is West Bengal. The Bay of Bengal Programme (BOBP), at the request of the Government of West Bengal, studied the problems connected wi th the supply of tiger shrimp fry to the bheries. The problems were seen as a constraint to the development of the mainly export-oriented shrimp culture industry. BOBP looked into both natural collection and hatchery-reared supply of shrimp fry. It also helped the West Bengal Department of Fisheries to establish a small hatchery at Digha and it worked with some of the fry catchers of Medinipur District through a local NGO. The study of all these activities as well as the marketing process was seen as a step towards a better understanding of the existing tiger shrimp fry market and the fisherfolk involved in it. This, it was hoped, would lead to an elimination of some, if not all, the problems associated with the business. The BOBP study was undertaken under the ‘Small-scale Fisherfolk Communities’ project (GCP/RAS/l18/MUL).
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    Nursery Rearing of Tiger Shrimp Post - Larvae in West Bengal, India -BOBP/WP/86 1993
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    Ever since the shrimp farming industry took off in Bangladesh and West Bengal, shrimp fry collection has developed into a major income-generating activitiy for thousands of people living in the coastal belts of these areas. This paper describes trials with nursery rearing of the tiger shrimp (Penaeus monodon) in floating cages. They were carried out in Ramnagar, Medinipur District, West Bengal, India, from 1990 to 1992. The purpose was to introduce a technology by which the fry-catchers could augment their income by nursing the shrimp fry to a larger size, with higher market value, and be in a better bargaining position vis-a-vis the traders. The trials were undertaken by a group of shrimp fry-catchers in Ramnagar, with support from the Bay of Bengal Programme (BOBP). The subproject was sponsored by BOBP’s “Small-Scale Fisherfolk Communities in the Bay of Bengal”, (GCP/RAS/118/MUL), a project jointly funded by SIDA (Swedish International Development Agency) and DANIDA (Danish Int ernational Development Agency) and executed by FAO (Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations).

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