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Year in review 2021: Pacific Islands

Highlights of FAO's emergency and resilience programming









FAO. 2022. Year in review 2021: Pacific Islands – Highlights of FAO's emergency and resilience programming. Rome.




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    Vanuatu: Response overview, August 2023 2023
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    On 1–3 March 2023, Tropical Cyclone Judy and Tropical Cyclone Kevin caused significant damage and losses to the agriculture sector and its subsectors in Vanuatu, exceeding USD 120 million. The twin tropical cyclones disrupted the livelihoods of more than 47 percent of farming households; and exacerbated their pre-existing vulnerabilities, following years of enormous challenges caused by Tropical Cyclone Harold, COVID-19 and three consecutive years of La Niña. In response, the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) joined forces with the Government of Vanuatu to scale up emergency and resilience interventions. The overall objective of the response is to enable the affected communities to restore their livelihoods and resume food production. This document provides an overview of FAO's response on the ground as well as the planned response until December 2023 and funding requirements.
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    Document
    Eighth Roundtable Meeting for Pacific Island Countries on the Implications of WTO Multilateral Trading System on the Agriculture Sector
    Wellington, New Zealand, 11-14 July 2005
    2006
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    The Eighth Round Table Meeting (8th RTM) for Pacific Island Countries on WTO Agreement Provisions was held at the Portland Hotel of Thorndon, Wellington, New Zealand from 11 - 14 July 2005. The meeting was attended by participants from the Cook Islands, Fiji Islands, Kiribati, Nauru, Niue, Palau, Papua New Guinea, Samoa, Solomon Islands, Tonga, Tuvalu and Vanuatu. Resource persons and speakers for the meeting were provided by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), the Forum Fisheries Agency (FFA), the Government of New Zealand, the International Fund for Agriculture Development (IFAD), the Pacific Islands Forum Secretariat (PIFS), the Auckland-based Pacific Islands Trade and Investment Commission (PITIC) and the Secretariat of the Pacific Community (SPC). The full list of participants and resource persons is attached as Annex 1. The Seventh Roundtable Meeting for Pacific Island Countries on the Implications of the World Trade Organization (WTO) Multilatera l Trading System on the Agriculture Sector was convened at the Terrace Conference, St John Building, 114 The Terrace in Wellington, New Zealand, from 1-7 July 2004. Senior Officials from the following countries attended: Cook Islands, Fiji, Kiribati, Niue, Papua New Guinea, Republic of the Marshall Islands, Samoa, Solomon Islands, Tonga, Tuvalu and Vanuatu. Resource persons and observers from New Zealand, FAO, Commonwealth Secretariat, International Fund for Agriculture Development (IFAD), Pacif ic Islands Forum Secretariat (PIFS), the Secretariat of the Pacific Community (SPC) and the Technical Center for Agricultural and Rural Cooperation (CTA) also attended the meeting. A list of participants is attached as Annex A.
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    Project
    Emergency Assistance to Reduce Impacts and Build Resilience in the Fisheries Sector Caused by Cyclone Tino and COVID-19 on Tuvalu - TCP/TUV/3801 2024
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    The islands of Tuvalu are all low-lying atolls. This has a significant effect on the country’s fishing activities, with subsistence activities dominating the country’s small-scale fisheries sector. A wide variety of techniques are used to catch fish and other marine resources, which are consumed, shared or informally bartered. Historically, community fisheries centres (CFCs) were established on a number of Tuvalu’s outer islands, with the intention of providing fishers with income-generating opportunities. In mid-January 2020, Tuvalu was battered by Tropical Cyclone (TC) Tino, which brought heavy rain, heavy swells and gale-force winds of up to 75 km/h, resulting in catastrophic flooding and significant damage to infrastructure and livelihoods. After the Government of Tuvalu declared a state of emergency, the World Bank and the Asian Development Bank collectively provided USD 9.3 million to the country to aid recovery. In response to the damaged inflicted by TC Tino, and with the subsequent emergence of the COVID-19 pandemic, the Government of Tuvalu also relocated some of the affected population from the main island of Funafuti to some of the outer islands.

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