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The Soil, how to improve the soil

Better Farming Series, no. 6 (1976)












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    Document
    The Soil, how to conserve the soil
    Better Farming Series, no. 5 (1976)
    1976
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    This manual is a translation and adaptation 11Le sol - comment conserver le sol? ", published by the ri-Service- Afrique of the lnstitut africain pour le developpement economique et social (INADES). The course covers erosion, soil conservation and farming techniques that protect soil resources.
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    Booklet
    World fertilizer trends and outlook to 2020
    Summary Report
    2017
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    The World fertilizer trends and outlook to 2020 is the latest in a series of annual reports that result from meetings of FAO Plant Production and Protection (AGP) and Statistics (ESS) Divisions, and the Fertilizer Organization Working Group, in which nitrogen, phosphate and potassium fertilizer medium-term supply and demand is estimated and projected for the following five years. The report is intended for use by a range of stakeholders in the public, private and educational sectors and c ivil society to use as a source of information and guide to fertilizer use and trends at global, regional and country levels, and to assist in planning and management of fertilizer resources.World consumption of the three main fertilizer nutrients, nitrogen (N), phosphorus expressed as phosphate (P2 O5 ), and potassium expressed as potash (K2 O), is estimated to reach 186.67 million tonnes (N, P2 O5 and K2 O) in 2016, up by 1.4 percent over 2015 consumption levels. The demand for N, P2 O5 , and K2 O is forecast to grow annually on average by 1.5, 2.2, and 2.4 percent respectively from 2015 to 2020. Over the next five years, the global capacity of the production of fertilizers, intermediates and raw materials is also expected to increase.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    Application of nitrogen-fixing systems in soil improvement and management
    FAO Soils Bulletin No.49
    1982
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    In view of the continuing increase in cost and scarcity of mineral fertilizers resulting from the use of high-cost fossil energy, there is renewed interest in organic recycling and biological nitrogen-fixation to improve soil fertility and productivity. The workshop in Alexandria recommended the further promotion of research, development, application and dissemination of information available on various aspects of biological nitrogen-fixation, including symbiotic systems of rhizobia/legume and Azolla/blue-green algae, and free-living nitrogen-fixing bacteria and blue-green algae. It is hoped that the compilation of various aspects of nitrogen-fixation under one cover in this Bulletin will be of interest and assistance to research workers and extension planners concerned with the further development and refinement of these natural systems for soil improvement and management.

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