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Building small wooden boats in Myanmar - 12 ft and 18 ft Multi-purpose boats

Immediate Rehabilitation of Subsistence Fisheries Livelihoods in Areas Affected by Cyclone Nargis (OSRO/MYA/805/SWE) Funded by the Government of Sweden







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    Book (series)
    Fishing boat construction: 4 - Building an undecked fibreglass reinforced plastic boat 2009
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    In many areas of the world, finding the type of timber needed to build a good quality wooden boat is becoming a problem. As a result, Fibreglass Reinforced Plastics (FRP) is beginning to be used by many wooden boat builders. The information provided in this manual relates specifically to production of a 4.5 m open fishing boat called the MDV- 1. It is a simple, easilydriven, seaworthy boat intended for both rowing and power propulsion. Its general-purpose design is suitable for inshore waters around the world. A general basic knowledge in the use of FRP as a boatbuilding material is presented and step by step construction of a 4.5 m open fishing boat using FRP is set out in detail. In addition, the booklet describes how to maintain an FRP boat and how to recognize fatigue problems. Some simple guidelines on how to repair minor damage to FRP are also included. The information is intended for less experienced boatbuilders who already have a plug or mould. (Making a plug is not easy and requires experience in reading line drawings and lofting frames.) It is assumed that people planning to build a boat already have a good, general understanding of basic hand tool use. This manual will also be a useful aid for maintaining and improving quality control practiced by boatbuilders who already have some experience working with this material. This manual should give boatbuilders and fishermen a better understanding of how FRP acts, how to recognize fa tigue problems and more serious damage, and how to carry out needed maintenance and repair.
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    TRAINING MANUAL on the construction of FRP beach landing boats 2010
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    This manual on construction of fibreglass reinforced plastic (FRP) beach landing boats has been prepared primarily to assist small boatyards in Tamil Nadu, India that build beach landing fishing boats, but may also be used as a guide for making good quality FRP boats as well as for FRP training in the region. The manual should be seen as a supplement to FRP boatbuilding manuals available in the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) and other international publ ications. It assumes prior knowledge of FRP hand lay-up processes and terms generally used in the industry. Recommendations on working conditions, materials and quality control are based on tropical ambient conditions and the type of boatyards likely to build such boats. Part I of the manual contains general information on FRP materials, handling and working conditions. Part II describes the building of a hull plug and a mould and Part III describes the building of a beach landing boat. Finally, Part IV contains information on manufacturing defects and repairs. The manual has four annexes that provide further information related to FRP boatbuilding. Annexes 1 and 2 contain a bibliography and a glossary, respectively. All drawings for the FAO IND-30 boat design are provided in Annex 3. Finally, Annex 4 contains the draft recommended construction standards for FRP fishing vessels. These standards are a part of the FAO/ILO/IMO Safety recommendations for decked fishing vessels of less than 12 m in length and undecked fishing vessels, which are currently under development.
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    Book (series)
    Fishing boat designs: 2. V-bottom boats of planked and plywood construction (Rev.2) 2004
    Timber remains the most common material for the construction of boats under 15 metres in length. There has been a change towards fibre-reinforced plastic in most developed countries and some developing countries but, in Africa, Asia and the Pacific, probably more than 90 percent of small fishing vessels are built of wood. The cost advantage of timber versus other materials is still sufficient to ensure that it will remain the dominant boatbuilding material for a long time to come in developing c ountries. However, unrestricted or illicit access to forest resources and the introduction of rational forestry management policies have caused and will continue to cause a scarcity of the sections of timbers traditionally favoured by boatbuilders. The resultant scarcity and high cost of good quality timber have not meant that less wooden boats are being built, but rather that vessel quality has deteriorated through the use of inferior timber and inadequate design strength. This updated and completely revised publication supersedes Revision 1 of FAO Fisheries Technical Paper 134 published in 1997. It follows an exhaustive study on structural timber design applied to wooden boat construction. The publication includes the designs of four small fishing vessels (from 5.2 to 8.5 metres), with comprehensive material specifications and lists, and provides detailed instructions for their construction, both planked and of plywood. The designs are appropriate for inshore and coastal fisheri es and emphasis has been placed on relative ease of construction and minimum wastage of timber.

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