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List of participants of the Verona conference








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    Meeting
    Meeting Summary and Key Findings 2010
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    Presentation during the 2nd FAO/OIE/WHO joint scientific consultation on Influenza and other emerging infectious diseases at the human-animal interface on 27-29 April 2010, Verona (Italy)
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    Book (stand-alone)
    Influenza and other zoonotic diseases at the human-animal interface
    FAO/OIE/WHO Joint Scientific Consultation, 27-29 April 2010, Verona (Italy)
    2011
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    Given the complexity of zoonotic disease emergence in an increasingly globalized world, effective strategies for reducing future threats must be identified. Lessons learned from past experiences controlling diseases such as severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI), and pandemic (H1N1) 2009, indicate that new paradigms are needed for early detection, prevention, and control to reduce persistent global threats from influenza and other emerging zoonotic dis eases. The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE), and the World Health Organization (WHO), in collaboration with the Istituto Zooprofilattico Sperimentale delle Venezie (IZSVe) organised a joint scientific consultation in Verona, Italy (27-29 April 2010) entitled “FAO-OIE-WHO Joint Scientific Consultation on Influenza and Other Emerging Zoonotic Diseases at the Human-Animal Interface". This document is a summary of the consu ltation. It provides examples of emerged or emerging zoonotic viral diseases. It describes commonalities across diseases and ideas for new approaches and suggests steps towards translating meeting outcomes into policy.
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    Document
    FAO Vietnam : The Fight against Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza and othe Emerging Infectious Diseases 2010
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    Since its emergence in early 2004, Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza (HPAI) caused by H5N1 has caused global concern, threatening both animal and human health.Viet Nam has been one of the countries worst affected with major impacts of the disease on poultry production, livelihoods and human health. FAO was established in Viet Nam in 1978. However following the onset of the disease, the Emergency Centre for Transboundary Animal Diseases Operations (ECTAD) was set up using FAO’s own finances to st art the programme. FAO works regionally and nationally to combat avian influenza in close collaboration with governments, national and international partners, bringing together technical expertise in socioeconomics, disease control, farming systems, agricultural and pro-poor policy, communications and extension. With the strong support and collaboration of the Government of Viet Nam FAO has provided technical and operational guidance for the control programme against HPAI and other major disease s such as foot and mouth disease and classical swine fever through the generous funding of several donors. In addition, to specific donor funded projects, the World Bank and the Government selected FAO to provide technical leadership and guidance to the Viet Nam Avian and Human Influenza Control and Preparedness Project (VAHIP) through the provision of technical advisers and specific expert consultancy services. The country team also receives support from the FAO regional and headquarters pool o f technical and operational resources, when required. In coordination with the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE), the World Health Organization (WHO) and United Nations System Influenza Coordinator (UNSIC), FAO has provided significant support to the Government of Viet Nam for the Hanoi pre-technical meeting and Inter-Ministerial Conference on Animal and Pandemic Influenza (IMCAPI) in April 2010.

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