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Disaster response and risk management in the fisheries sector.










Westlund, L.; Poulain, F.; Bage, H.; van Anrooy, R. Disaster response and risk management in the fisheries sector. FAO Fisheries Technical Paper. No. 479. Rome, FAO. 2007. 56p.


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