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Report of the Third Expert Meeting on Socially and Environmentally Responsible Horticulture Production and Trade

Theme: Building partnerships for responsible trade








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    Document
    Second Expert Meeting on Socially and Environmentally Responsible Banana Production and Trade - Report
    San José, Costa Rica,10-11 December 2001
    2001
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    The second Expert Meeting on Socially and Environmentally Responsible Banana Production and Trade was held in San José, 10-11 December 2001. The first day of the meeting was dedicated to the Working Group on Socially and Environmentally Responsible Horticulture Production and Trade. Recent developments in the standard setting and certification initiatives active in the banana sector were presented. The participants agreed on a plan of activities for the Working Group. On the second day various representatives of the Costa Rican Ministry of Agriculture, banana producers and the Consumers Union presented their experiences with the various certification initiatives. In the afternoon discussions were held in two groups.
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    Article
    Possibility of local wood from a global perspective the environmental performance on wooden main stadium of Tokyo 2020
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
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    Timber is a renewable and sustainable material which potentially plays a leading role in the development of a sustainable society. This is the rationale behind Japan passing the Act for Promotion of Use of Wood in Buildings, etc. to Contribute to the Realization of a Decarbonized Society in 2021. To promote timber utilization, the forestry and timber business sectors should cooperate with green consumers. However, there are several challenges to address before such a cooperation can be achieved: illegal logging, vulnerable forest management, and related trade. FSC and PEFC have made substantial contributions by developing forest management schemes with supply chain certification. However, voluntary certification schemes have a cost bottleneck to become mainstream in the global timber supply chain. The Woodmiles Forum, a Japanese private organization, argued that locality is an important factor in eliminating environmental risks. Firstly, it reduces the environmental impact of CO2 emissions from the transportation process, which accounts for half the carbon footprint. Secondly, it reduces the cost of transporting long-distance environmental information, such as forest and legality certification. Taking advantage of this accumulation, the Forum evaluated the new national stadium, which was the main venue for Tokyo 2020. The stadium is built of regional local timber from all over Japan. We compared the results of this evaluation with the evaluation of the facilities in London 2012. The environmental significance of regional timber is that the transparency of the supply chain can be easily ensured. Additionally, the environmental load of the timber transportation process is small, and this is the focus of this study. Keywords: Local Wood, Woodmiles, Tokyo 2020, Circular Economy, Climate Change ID:3486248
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    Book (series)
    Present and future markets for fish and fish products from small-scale fisheries - Case studies from Asia, Africa and Latin America. (Available online only) 2008
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    At the twenty-sixth session of the FAO Committee on Fisheries, FAO was requested to identify how trade in fish and fish products could further benefit small-scale fisheries and generate additional income and employment within the sector. Following this request, case studies were carried out in selected Latin American, African and Asian countries to study the importance of small-scale fisheries trade and identify opportunities for better integration into regional and international fish trade. The findings and recommendations of the case studies were presented and discussed at the tenth session of the FAO Sub-Committee on Fish Trade, held in Santiago de Compostela, Spain, from 30 May to 2 June 2006. In the countries studied, the contribution of the small-scale fisheries sector to the total marine catch was significant and ranged from 70 to 95 percent. The studies show that products from small-scale fisheries are largely focused on the domestic market. In Africa regional trade in small-scale fisheries products was found to be very important for meeting the protein requirements of poor people. Women are actively involved in fish processing and marketing and also participate in capture fisheries in coastal areas and estuaries as well as in other forms of harvesting of aquatic organisms. Their involvement results in increased well-being of their households since womens income is largely spent on food and childrens education. Study findings suggest that women can gain from increasing trade opportunities through their involvement in value adding activities and enterprises. The studies identified several avenues for better integration of small-scale fisheries into regional and international fish trade. Among them are product diversification, value addition, improvement of product quality and the access to new markets. However, a number of constraints need to be overcome before this can be achieved. Post-harvest losses due to poor infrastructure and lack of sto rage and transportation facilities need to be reduced and knowledge of proper fish handling methods needs to be improved. While products for export are meeting high quality standards, products for domestic and regional markets are often processed using substandard hygienic methods. Small-scale fisheries are also excluded from international markets because of the costs and difficulties encountered when trying to comply with international standards and those imposed by supermarket chains and other customers. The studies suggest that efforts should be aimed at improving facilities for preserving fish onboard, at the establishment of hygienic fish landing sites, increasing storage facilities and the supply of ice as well as improving roads, which connect fishing communities to markets. Equally important are the improvement of technical support and extension services to enable fishing communities to access appropriate technologies and information and training on quality improvement, p roper fish handling procedures and storage, product diversification, value addition as well as on packaging. Fishing communities should also be assisted in assessing their fisheries and aquatic resources and identifying those that have potential for trade in the domestic, regional and international markets. Small-scale fishers and processors can get better prices for their products by shortening the fish supply chain and increasing their bargaining and lobbying power. In this regard, the fo rmation of marketing cooperatives should be encouraged and existing associations of small-scale fishers and processors should be strengthened by providing support for institution building. There is also a need to raise awareness among microfinance institutions regarding the needs of the small-scale fisheries sector for credit and savings services.

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