Thumbnail Image

Rift Valley fever vaccine development, progress and constraints

GF-TADs meeting / November 2010









Also available in:
No results found.

Related items

Showing items related by metadata.

  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (series)
    Rift Valley fever outbreaks in Madagascar and potential risks to neighbouring countries 2008
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    Rift Valley fever (RVF) is an arthropod-borne viral disease of ruminants, camels and humans. It is a significant zoonosis which may present itself from an uncomplicated influenza-like illness to a haemorrhagic disease with severe liver involvement and ocular or neurological lesions. In animals, RVF may be unapparent in non-pregnant adults, but outbreaks are characterised by the onset of a large number of abortions and high neonatal mortality. The virus (Phlebovirus) is usually transmitted by var ious arthropods. Human infections have also resulted from the bites of infected mosquitoes, most commonly the Aedes mosquito. Mosquitoes from six genera (Aedes, Culex, Mansonia, Anopheles, Coquillettidia and Eretmapodites), including more than 30 species, have been recorded as infected, and some of them are proven to have a role as vectors. Most of these species acquire the infection by biting infected vertebrate animals, but some (specifically Aedes spp.) pass the virus transovarially (vertical transmission). These infected pools of eggs can survive through desiccation for months or years and restart transmission after flooding; then other species (Culex spp.) may be involved as secondary vectors. Vertical transmission (from an infected female mosquito to eggs) explains how the virus can persist for many years or decades between outbreaks.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (series)
    The last hurdles towards Rift Valley Fever control
    Report on the ad hoc workshop on the current state of Rift Valley fever vaccine and diagnostics development – Rome, 5–7 March 2014
    2015
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    In the past decade, tremendous progress has been made in the development of Rift Valley fever (RVF) vaccines, and several next-generation vaccines are currently being evaluated in registration trials. However, due to the sporadic, yet explosive nature of RVF outbreaks, the challenge remains to have these vaccines available at the right time and place. Innovative, appropriate diagnostics will aid in the selection of vaccines and will help to determine when to vaccinate animals. To address these i ssues, the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) organized a technical workshop in March 2014. The workshop was supported by the National Center for Foreign Animal and Zoonotic Disease Defense (FAZD) and the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), in collaboration with representatives of the Central Veterinary Institute, Wageningen University and Research Centre (CVI-WUR), the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). Global experts in RVF vaccine development, leading veterinary vaccine manufacturers and the chief veterinary officers from Egypt, Kenya, Mauritania, Senegal and Sudan attended the meeting. Issues related to the application of classical vaccines in endemic areas were discussed, as well as novel vaccines that are already used in the field or are currently being evaluated in registration trials. These vaccines are expected to fulfil the features related to safety and efficacy recommended in the previous FAO meeting, held in Rome in January 2011. Due to these developments, we have entered a new era in which effective vaccines for the widespread vaccination of livestock will be available. Logistical and political issues are the last major hurdles to RVF control.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (series)
    Possible RVF activity in the Horn of Africa 2006
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    Rift Valley fever (RVF) is an arthropod-borne viral disease of ruminants, camels and humans. It is a significant zoonosis which may present itself from an uncomplicated influenza-like illness to a haemorrhagic disease with severe liver involvement and ocular or neurological lesions. In animals, RVF may be unapparent in non-pregnant adults, but outbreaks are characterised by the onset of abortions and high neonatal mortality. Transmission to humans may occur through close contact with infected ma terial (slaughtering or manipulation of runts), but the virus (Phlebovirus) is transmitted in animals by various arthropods including 6 mosquito genus (Aedes, Culex, Mansonia, Anopheles, Coquillettidia and Eretmapodites) with more than 30 species of mosquitoes recorded as infected and some of them been proved to have a role as vectors. Most of these species get the infection by biting infected vertebrates, yet some of these (specifically Aedes species) transmit the virus to their eggs. These inf ected pools of eggs can survive through desiccation during months or years and restart the transmission after flooding, and then other species (Culex spp.) may be involved as secondary vectors. This vertical infection explains how the disease can persist between outbreaks.

Users also downloaded

Showing related downloaded files

No results found.