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Food Security - Communications Toolkit







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    Book (stand-alone)
    Media and Communication Resource Kit 2011
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    This Communication Package provides a brief overview of some principles of good communication and some tips about raising the visibility of the International Treaty on Plant Genetic Resources for Food and Agriculture, whether it is through information materials you write and publish, through interviews with media outlets, or through public appearances where you may address a classroom, a workshop or a lecture hall filled with experts. The goal is to make sure that you are able to tell th e Treaty’s story – what it is, what it does, how it does it – in a way that is tailored for your audience, be it an audience that is reading a brochure you have written, listening to you make a talk or watching an interview you did with local television station. In reality, the rules of good communication are straightforward. You must have a clear goal of what you want your audience to know and then present that information with the logic and the terminology that your audience will und erstand. For the sake of efficiency, this Kit focuses on the media, but what applies to the media can also be applied to preparing an information document for publication or preparing remarks to make at a public event.
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    Book (series)
    Framework perspective on local participation in policy: Views through FAO experience 2007
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    The goal of this exercise is to identify some of the tools a development agent needs for achieving effective local participation in policy development. The intended audiences are FAO professionals and their colleagues, in other agencies and in the field programs. This paper uses an analogy of walking and climbing to separate the familiar project experiences (the walking) from the less-known territory of policy influence (the climbing). This exercise is unusual in that it looks back at a number of field experiences that were not formulated with a focus on local participation in policy development (no one started out with the intention to climb). From a research perspective we attempted to understand processes after the fact rather than following them as they developed, and we leaned on fields such as organizational management that deal with such challenges on a regular basis. The case studies here were written with the aim of learning about the participatory policy development processes that took place around and within the contexts of the FAO projects. The majority of selected cases constitute a series of projects that started with a technical orientation (e.g. food security) and over time began to appreciate the significance of the policy context as an area where the project could play a direct role. All projects contributed by creating new capacities at the individual and organizational levels. They created networking opportunities (spaces) w hereby different stakeholders gained a voice. While many of those spaces were temporary, their very existence established both a precedent and a sense of what is possible. However, by not having an explicit “policy influence” agenda, the projects may have missed opportunities to document and report on some of these achievements. In the analogy: the walker may have climbed without knowing he followed good practices because he did not know their name, or their foundation.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    Assessing the digital readiness and communication ecosystem of rural youth
    Methodological guidelines
    2024
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    Digitalization is a potential game-changer to boost youth engagement and leadership in agrifood systems. Digital engagement can increase youth access to timely information, training, or marketing opportunities while providing more venues for peer learning, networking, and participation in policy dialogues. Yet, the transformative power of digital technologies also entails the risk of widening existing divides. As we seek to engage youth in the digital space, we must consider a series of interrelated factors that influence their online experiences ranging from digital access, use, and literacy, to overall information flows, offline communication resources, social interactions, and the norms shaping them. These methodological guidelines will be a useful resource for development professionals who wish to leverage communication and digital technologies in their work with and for youth. The document provides an analytical framework and practical orientation to conduct age-specific and gender-responsive research on digital readiness and the overall communication ecosystem of young people in order to inform inclusive engagement strategies and youth-centred digital services. Section 1 explains the rationale behind investing time and resources in appraising the existing communication ecosystem before designing any initiative aimed at engaging youth in agrifood systems and in rural areas. Section 2 outlines an analytical framework to unpack the digital readiness and the communication ecosystem of young rural women and men along major investigation areas: digital access, use and skills; information flows; offline communication resources; and social capital and social norms. Section 3 describes how to conduct hands-on research combining the use of both qualitative and quantitative methods. Section 4 summarizes final considerations and take-home messages. The Annexes provide two examples of data collection tools, namely a mobile survey questionnaire and a focus group discussion guide, while the Field Stories present real-life examples testifying to the multiple and varied applications of the methodology within the scope of FAO’s Integrated Country Approach (ICA) for Boosting Decent Jobs for Youth in the Agrifood System project.

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