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Statistics on the production and trade of forest seeds and other forest plant material









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    Book (stand-alone)
    Analysis of the Seed Market in Afghanistan
    Strengthening National Seed Production Capacity in Afghanistan
    2007
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    n order to generate relevant information about seed demand, the FAO/EC project Strengthening National Seed Production Capacity in Afghanistan (GCP/AFG/018/EC) organized a Survey in May- June 2004, which was carried out by the Coordination of Afghan Relief (CoAR) Survey Unit (formerly called the Afghan Survey Unit) to: (i) examine the seed buying behaviour of farming households with the view to estimate the potential deman d for quality see d of major crops; (ii) investigate possibilities for market-oriented seed production; and (iii) examine the nature of prices and farmers’ attitudes regarding variety choice and seed us e, and explore ways to influence these to promote demand for quality seed. The Survey was based on a random selection of 2 887 farming households who contributed to the completion of 3 508 questionnaires, with each questionnaire obtaining information for a particular crop. Since no record was kept of households who supplied information for more than one crop, this report treats each completed questionnaire as information from one farmer.
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    Book (series)
    Classification of forest products 2022 2022
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    The statistical classification system for forest products enables the collection, compilation, analysis and dissemination of high-quality global data on forest products by ensuring that information is comparable across countries. FAO and the United Nations Economic Commission for Europe (UNECE) published the first version of the Classification of forest products (CFP) in 1973. Two updates have since been published, in 1979 and in 1981. Over time, the structure of the forest industry has shifted toward higher value products with complex value chains and increasingly diverse end-uses. This fourth revision covers the current spectrum of primary and secondary wood and paper products: wood taken from forests or from trees outside forests; bark and cork; charcoal; wood and wood-based materials resulting from the first processing of wood available from forest operations (e.g. sawnwood, railway sleepers, veneer sheets, wood pulp and wood residues); materials resulting from the further processing of some of these materials (e.g. wood-based panels, paper and paperboard); and recovered paper and recoverable wood products. Statistical standards are a foundation of internationally comparable statistics. This statistical classification system for forest products enables the collection, compilation, analysis and dissemination of high-quality global data on forest products, including production, trade, and production capacity. It enables information that is comparable across countries, supports the aggregation and disaggregation of datasets in meaningful ways, and enables data with the insight to drive policymaking and decision-making.
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    Book (series)
    National socioeconomic surveys in forestry: guidance and survey modules for measuring the multiple roles of forests in household welfare and livelihoods 2016
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    Better understanding the contributions of forests and trees in household welfare, livelihoods and poverty reduction is crucial for achieving several Sustainable Development Goals. Yet, systematic comparison of human dependence on forests and trees has often been focusing on case studies. Developing nationally- representative figures on the contributions of forest and wild products in households throughout countries requires a more systematic approach across vegetation/forest types, ecoregions and different factors influencing the levels of resource use. Enabling thereby consistent measurement of such contributions at national level could lead to more informed policymaking and better capture of the true value of forests and trees in a range of metrics, such as national poverty measurements and GDP. With this view, the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), the Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR), the International Forestry Resources and Institutions (IFRI) Network, and the World Bank's Living Standards Measurement Study (LSMS) team and Program on Forests (PROFOR) developed specialized forestry modules and the guidance on using them, particularly for LSMS- type surveys. These modules, covering 15 thematic areas, are expected to help in filling current information gaps concerning the relationship of forests and trees to household welfare and livelihoods. This publication, targeted primarily at national statistical offices, explains how these modules can be used, including customizing them according to policy and research needs of different users. It also briefly covers the results of the pilot tests of the modules in Indonesia, United Republic of Tanzania and Nepal.

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