Thumbnail Image

Food policy monitoring in the Near East and North Africa region. 4th Quarter 2022 | Bulletin








FAO. 2022. Food policy monitoring in the Near East and North Africa region. 4th Quarter 2022 | Bulletin. Cairo.   


Also available in:
No results found.

Related items

Showing items related by metadata.

  • Thumbnail Image
    Journal, magazine, bulletin
    Food policy monitoring in the Near East and North Africa region. 1st Quarter 2023 | Bulletin 2023
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    While global food and fertilizer prices have continued to withdraw from their March 2022 peaks, they remain high compared to their 2019–2021 levels. International grain quotations also remain well above their value in preceding years. Tight international grain markets, the ongoing war in Ukraine, uncertainties about the Black Sea Grain Initiative’s renewal, and currency depreciations pose risks to global food security and nutrition, especially in net food-importing Arab countries. Food prices are expected to remain high in 2023 as a result of geopolitical tensions, high energy costs, supply shortages, and weather events. Consequently, high food inflation persists in the NENA region. Section II of the Bulletin focuses on the climate change-related agricultural policies and innovations introduced by Arab countries to mitigate and adapt to climate change. These policies aim to increase production in harsh climatic conditions and improve food security while transforming food systems to be resilient against shocks induced by climate change
  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (stand-alone)
    The 2007 - 2008 food price swing - Impact and policies in Eastern and Southern Africa
    Fao Commodities and Trade Technical Paper 12
    2009
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    Between 2007 and 2008, the world experienced a dramatic swing in commodity prices. Food commodity prices also increased substantially during the summer of 2008, reaching their highest level in nearly thirty years, before decreasing sharply as expectations for an economic recession set in. Eastern and Southern African countries experienced considerable difficulties due to the price food swing. The food price boom resulted in increased poverty and significant food security problems as households struggled to meet the high cost of food. At the macroeconomic level, high food import bills, inflation and foreign exchange constraints increased the fragility of developing and less developed countries. Although the ensuing world economic recession did lead to a drop in food prices, it carried with it a different set of problems. The decline in exports due to weak demand, decreased foreign investment and migrant remittances, as well as high unemployment all added to the b urden of already vulnerable African countries. Policy reactions to the food price surge have been prompt in many developing countries. A number of short-run measures in order to rein in the increase in food prices and to protect consumers and vulnerable population groups were introduced, such as reductions in import tariffs. Other countries resorted to food inventory management aimed at stabilizing domestic prices. A range of interventions have also been implemented to mitigate the a dverse impacts on vulnerable households, such as targeted subsidized food sales. Other countries scaled-up already existing input subsidy programs to assist producers and stimulate supply response as fertilizer prices also soared.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Journal, magazine, bulletin
    Food Price Monitoring and Analysis Bulletin #7, 9 September 2021 2021
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    International cereal prices followed mixed trends in August. Wheat prices surged as production prospects deteriorated significantly in several major producing countries. Among coarse grains, reduced production forecasts also boosted barley prices, while maize and sorghum prices continued to decline from their multi‑year highs reached in May. International rice prices remained on a downward trajectory in August, influenced by efforts to attract sales and by currency movements. In East Africa, prices of coarse grains generally increased in August, especially in countries where first/main season harvests dropped sharply. Prices were generally higher than one year earlier, with exceptionally high levels still prevailing in the Sudan and South Sudan. In West Africa, solid domestic demand amidst constrained market availabilities hindered by supply chain bottlenecks and locally volatile security conditions exacerbated seasonal upward trends in the prices of domestically produced coarse grains, which lingered at levels well above their year-earlier values.

Users also downloaded

Showing related downloaded files

No results found.