Thumbnail Image

Addressing transboundary animal diseases through a One Health approach Newsletter, 3rd quarter 2021 - Issue #1










Also available in:
No results found.

Related items

Showing items related by metadata.

  • Thumbnail Image
    Newsletter
    FAO Africa Emergency Centre for Transboundary Animal Diseases Newsletter, March 2024 – Issue #1 2024
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    The thematic focus of the FAO ECTAD Africa Newsletter revolves around highlighting the efforts and impacts of the FAO ECTAD programme in Africa. Specifically, it emphasizes the programme's contributions to building capacities in preventing, detecting, and responding to transboundary animal diseases, zoonoses, antimicrobial resistance (AMR), and food safety threats in African countries where ECTAD is present. Additionally, the newsletter aims to shed light on emerging trends, challenges, and best practices in the realm of animal health and food safety within the African context.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Project
    Strengthening Regional Capacities to Address COVID-19 Impacts on Animal Health Sector in East and Southeast Asia - TCP/RAS/3801 2023
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    In December 2019, China reported cases of pneumonia with an unknown cause in Wuhan City. The causative agent was later attributed to a novel coronavirus – SARS-CoV-2. The virus quickly spread and became a global health threat, leading the World Health Organization (WHO) to declare the outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) a public health emergency of international concern in January 2020 and as a pandemic in March 2020. The outbreak was believed to be associated with a wet market in Wuhan where seafood and wild animals were sold. This was corroborated by environmental samples from the market that tested positive for SARS-CoV-2. The SARS-CoV-2 was suspected to have originated in bats and spread among humans, yet the transmission through livestock was believed possible. Some companion animals, such as dogs, cats and ferrets, have tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 after close contact with infected humans. However, it is unclear whether these animals played a role in the spread of the virus among humans. In light of the One Health approach, there was a need to strengthen the capacities of animal health services to detect, prevent and manage the likely transmission of SARS-CoV-2 at the animal–human interface. The Emergency Centre for Transboundary Animal Diseases (ECTAD) in the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) is well positioned to provide technical and operational support, in collaboration with FAO headquarters and ECTAD country teams, to address the impact of COVID-19 on food security, livelihoods related to livestock and the animal–human interface.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Document
    Global Public Health and Transboundary Animal Diseases: Issues and Options, Approaches and Concerns 2010
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    Transboundary animal diseases will continue to emerge around the globe, with human-to-human spread potential, and multiple associated costs to societies and governments. These emerging threats can be addressed and reduced through the application of holistic and proactive disease risk management approaches that build on disease intelligence, multidisciplinary collaborations, public-private partnerships, international commitments, and scientific progress. Although a focus on biosecurity measures a long the production and marketing chain have proved beneficial so far, there is need to broaden measures geared to increase awareness among at-risk populations and targeted educational campaigns at vulnerable communities with the goal of changing, or at least influencing, the demeanours, habits and behaviours of people in such a way that the risks of disease contraction and transmission are decreased. For instance, the United States and the European Union are addressing the emergence and intensi fication of emerging biological threats across diverse ecological landscapes through identification and early tackling of critical disease drivers and risk factors. A key aspect of the approaches proposed is that they rely on working with economic actors and that they aims to develop with them sets of safe practices in production, processing, transportation, marketing and handling that are seen as coherent, applicable, practical, and in line with the realities in the ground. Further issues that need to be considered are cost-effectiveness, conflicts of interests, and sustainability.

Users also downloaded

Showing related downloaded files

No results found.