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Recent examples of invasive forest pests in Europe

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    Article
    Invasive alien plants, insect pests and pathogens in Planted and Natural forests in Nepal: Key lessons from an online survey on distribution and impacts
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
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    Owing to its diverse climatic and topographic condition, Nepal hosts diverse forests and rich biodiversity which provide a variety of ecosystem goods and services. Spread of invasive alien plants, insect pests and pathogens (IAS) has been contributing to degrading forest ecosystem services in Nepal. This study outlined the status, distribution and impact of IAS on forest ecosystem using an online survey among forest officers and forest technicians across Nepal. Invasion and management of pests and diseases is quite limited and under-reported, while the management measures on IAPs are growing. Raising awareness at individual and community levels and capacity building among three levels of government (local, provincial and federal) aids sustainable management of IAS and supports continuous delivery of forest goods and services. Keywords: IAS, biological invasions, severity of damages, control measures, forest health ID: 3486929
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    Document
    Smell the disease - Developing rapid, high-throughput and non-destructive screening methods for early detection of alien invasive forest pathogens and pests featuring next-generation technologies
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
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    Global forests are increasingly threatened by alien invasive pathogens and pests. The magnitude of this threat is expected to further increase in the future, due to the warmer climate and more extensive global transports and trade of plants. Pests and pathogens are often introduced to new areas by trade with ornamental plants as intermediate hosts, and there is a great need to modernize the tools for detection of alien species in imported plants and in monitoring of those that are already established in our forests. To achieve this goal, research in forest pathology is focused on combining recent technological advances in robotics, next generation sequencing, and mass spectroscopic methods with knowledge about the specific metabolic responses in the pests and pathogens and the trees that they infest. Gas Chromatography (GC) Analysis of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) adsorbed on Solid Phase Micro-Extraction (SPME) fibers is one promising method with potential for high-throughput detection of larger plant shipments. By the establishment of a library of chemical fingerprints characterizing specific pests and pathogens, one could non-destructively scan a large number of plants in ports or nurseries to eliminate presence of disease. The species-specific combination of VOCs can be utilized to prevent introduction of harmful pests and pathogens to new markets. One pathogen considered as a quarantine species and a serious threat on-the-horizon for coniferous forests is Pine Pitch Canker (PPC), a fungal pathogen affecting a variety of pine species with devastating economical and biological consequences, especially if it were to be established in a country like Sweden where about 38% of the standing forest volume consist of pine. Pathogens like this one are already introduced in several European countries, and need to be monitored and identified early to prevent further forest damage – a challenge that Forest pathologists have accepted. Keywords: Climate change, Sustainable forest management, Research, Monitoring and data collection, Deforestation and forest degradation ID: 3499048
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    Book (stand-alone)
    Invasive alien plants in the forests of Asia and the Pacific 2013
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    Invasive alien plants constitute a little recognized but very substantial threat to forests in the Asia-Pacific region. Their negative impacts can be widespread. The first step in managing invasive alien plants is to recognize them - both those that have stealthily entered our ecosystems and those that have the potential to do so. This book provides the first-ever collation of invasive alien plants threatening the forests of Asia-Pacific. It identifies the native region, current distributions, h abitats, threats and damage associated with 111 species of invasive alien plants. Information on uses and methods of management are also provided. Each plant is illustrated with multiple colour photos and a map of its current geographic distribution. This publication can assist countries to investigate current and prospective pathways of invasions and plan ahead.

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