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Improved fallows in Kenya








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    Shortened bush-fallow rotations and sustainable rural livelihood 2006
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    In Ghana, increased population pressure and the need to cultivate greater land area have resulted in reduced fallow periods. As a consequence, the restoration of soil fertility is insufficient to allow recovery of secondary forest and rejuvenation of exhausted soils. Fallows are of ecological, economic and social importance to rural people and to the nation at large. A majority of farmers depend on fallowing, using little or no fertilisers to improve impoverished soils. This implies that farm production (and income) will consistently decline over the years. Several promising technologies have been developed in the last decade to address these issues. On‑farm trials have demonstrated the value of maize‑legume relays, permanent plantain, cocoa‑shade trees, planted tree fallow, and yam‑legume relays in improving yields and restoring soil fertility
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    The development prospect of coppiced dalbergia plantation in Indonesia
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
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    Dalbergia latifolia Roxb. is a premium wood traded in the international market as Rosewood, and currently included in the CITES Appendix II. In Indonesia, D. latifolia is suitable and popular to be intercropped within agroforestry system. However, the species is generally considered as too slow-growing to be preferred to timber plantation trees. Thus, promoting private, community and government plantations is necessary to support future timber stock and gene conservation. This study was aimed to examine the possibility of establishing coppiced D. latifolia plantation. This study involved observation and measurement in the field and nursery. Field observation and measurement were carried out both in a private and national forested land in West, Central and East Java of Indonesia, while propagation trials were conducted at a nursery in Bogor–West Java. Field observation indicated that certain population from West Java showed faster growth that in the 3-4-year- the trees reached 15-27 cm in DBH. Vegetative propagation trials showed that root cutting is more prospective that that of shoot cutting (sprouting ability >90%). Experiment on root growth from planting stocks originated from root cutting produced massive lateral roots (total root length 4 m - 8 m within six month). Small roots with 4 m – 5 m in length can be source for producing new individuals. Field observation also revealed that the stumps produced 3 - >20 sprouts that can further utilize as shoot cutting sources and among them (1-3 sprouts) would develop into new individual and take the role as new main stem replacing the previous harvested one. Thus, it is prospective to develop a coppiced plantation of D. latifolia which will be beneficial in term of ecology and economy. The slow-growing tree term previously accepted in general term may not be applied as at suitable habitat they may grow aggressively and categorize as fast growing with the diameter increment can achieve 4–7 cm/year. Keywords: rosewood, plantation, propagation, regeneration potential, sprouts ID: 3486358
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    Growth and physiological acclimation to shade in young plants of Adesmia bijuga Phil., critically endangered species in central Chile
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
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    Adesmia bijuga Phil. is an endemic and endangered shrub species of central Chile. Its potential shade intolerance is one of the leading hypotheses for its vigor loss when the species grows beneath closed canopies. In this study we aimed to assess growth and physiological acclimation to shade in young of A. bijuga plants. A nursery experiment was established with three light levels based on the interception of photosynthetic active radiation (PAR) (TRT0: control at full sun, TRT60: 60% shaded, and TRT90: 90% shaded), and maintained for 71 days during the summer season. Growth and leaf morpho-physiological responses were evaluated at the beginning, at the middle, and at the end of the experiment. The shading treatment increased plant height (H) and live crown percentage (Lcrown) compared to the control treatment at full sun. However, light-saturated photosynthetic rate (Amax), dark respiration rate (Rd), and light compensation point (Gi) were higher in TRT60 than in the other treatments.No differences were found among treatments for the apparent quantum yield (α). At this stage of plant development, our results suggest high acclimation plasticity of A. bijuga to light levels; however, a semi-shade environment (i.e., TRT60) favored a better performance of the species. Keywords: Shade tolerance, photosynthesis, light acclimation, forest restoration. ID: 3624055

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