Thumbnail Image

Integrating fisheries into the development discourse










Also available in:

Related items

Showing items related by metadata.

  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (series)
    Report of the FAO/APFIC/SEAFDEC Regional Workshop on Port State Measures to Combat Illegal, Unreported and Unregulated (IUU) Fishing. Bangkok, Thailand, 31 March–4 April 2008. 2008
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    This document contains the report of the FAO/APFIC/SEAFDEC [Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations/Asia Pacific Fisheries Commission/Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center] Regional Workshop on Port State Measures to Combat Illegal, Unreported and Unregulated Fishing, that was held in Bangkok, Thailand, from 31 March to 4 April 2008. The objective of the Workshop was to develop national capacity and promote bilateral, subregional and/or regional coordination so t hat countries would be better placed to strengthen and harmonize port State measures and, as a result, implement further the 2001 FAO International Plan of Action to Prevent, Deter and Eliminate Illegal, Unreported and Unregulated Fishing, the 2005 FAO Model Scheme on Port State Measures to Combat Illegal, Unreported and Unregulated Fishing and contribute to the development of a legally-binding instrument on port State measures. The Workshop addressed: the background and framework fo r port State measures; the FAO Model Scheme including national plans of action to combat IUU fishing and IUU fishing activities in Southeast Asia; the FAO Model Scheme and regional approaches and the 2007 draft Agreement on Port State Measures to Prevent, Deter and Eliminate Illegal, Unreported and Unregulated Fishing; key elements of national laws, and the role of the Asia Pacific Fisheries Commission and the Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center; national coordination and impl ementation of port State measures; industry perspectives on port State measures, and responses to the questionnaire on port State measures. Working groups were formed to enhance the participatory nature of the Workshop and as a means of engendering broader and deeper discussion on concepts and issues relating to port State measures. A fictitious case study exercise was also undertaken to demonstrate how a port State might deal with a realistic IUU fishing problem. The final session o f the Workshop sought to identify key issues to be addressed on a regional basis as follow-up to the Workshop. Funding and support for the Workshop were provided by the FAO Regular Programme, by the Government of Norway through the Trust Fund for Port State Measures (MTF/GLO/206/MUL) and the FishCode Programme (MTF/GLO/125/MUL [Sweden-SIDA] [SWE/05/IUU Port State Measures/IUU fishing]).
  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (stand-alone)
    Strengthening assessment of fisheries and aquaculture in the Asia-Pacific region for policy development
    APFIC/FAO Regional Consultative Workshop
    2012
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    Strengthening assessment of fisheries and aquaculture in the Asia-Pacific region for policy development At its 31st session, the Asia-Pacific Fishery Commission (APFIC) emphasized the need for lower cost fishery assessment methods that are not heavily reliant on survey cruises and for developing assessment techniques for data-poor, small-scale fisheries based on qualitative data and risk-based approaches. It also identified the need for improved management of aquaculture at the farm and sector l evels. As a result, APFIC organized a regional consultative forum on strengthening assessment of fisheries and aquaculture in the Asia-Pacific region for policy development convened in Yangon, Myanmar from 4 to 6 October 2011. The workshop brought together 58 participants from member countries and regional partner organizations to discuss, hold consultations on, and influence the region's efforts on developing and applying various types of fishery and aquaculture related assessments to support t he management process. In the context of capture fisheries, the focus was on reviewing how existing assessment approaches can contribute to the different phases of the management process. The focus in aquaculture was to help develop standards for environmental impact assessments and footprint type activities to support ecosystem approaches to management. This publication reports on the outcomes of the workshop, including a summary of the recommendations.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (series)
    Mainstreaming fisheries into national development and poverty reduction strategies: current situation and opportunities 2004
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    The formulation of Poverty Reduction Strategy Papers (PRSPs) is one of the main conditions for concessional lending by IMF and World Bank to developing countries. Nevertheless, while evidence indicates that the fisheries sector can contribute (often markedly at the local level) to improved livelihoods and the achievement of food security in many developing countries, the sector is often neglected in PRSPs. This Circular first identifies of 129 countries in Africa, Asia, Latin America, Econ omies in Transition and Small Island Developing States (SIDS) the significance of the fisheries sector as motor of economic growth or likely poverty refuge. Secondly, it examines the extent to which National Development Plans (NDPs), PRSPs, Country Strategy Papers (CSPs) of the European Union and other donor support programmes have presently incorporated the fisheries sector into such documents. Subsequently, a comparison with data indicating the importance of the sector to the national economy (in terms of generating foreign exchange and/or supporting domestic protein consumption levels) enables us to pinpoint those countries with substantive fisheries sectors, but a correspondingly lower than expected degree of sectoral mainstreaming in NDPs, PRSPs and CSPs, and allows us to identify countries which are currently punching above their weight in this respect. Findings are discussed on a regional basis regional averages suggesting that the sector has been most effectively mainstre amed in Asia (case of PRSPs, NDPs and World Bank donor support strategies) closely followed by the African economies and the Small Island Developing States (SIDS). In contrast Latin America, home to two of the top six global fishing nations (Chile and Peru), scores extremely poorly as far as mainstreaming the fisheries sector in PRSPs and NDPs concerns.

Users also downloaded

Showing related downloaded files

No results found.