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LAT assessment – Nepal






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    Book (stand-alone)
    Livestock country reviews - Poultry sector: Nepal 2014
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    The poultry sector continues to grow and industrialize in many parts of the world. An increasing human population, greater purchasing power and urbanization have been strong drivers of growth. Advances in breeding have given rise to birds that meet specialized purposes and are increasingly productive, but that need expert management. The development and transfer of feed, slaughter and processing technologies have increased safety and efficiency of poultry production, but favour large-scale units rather than small-scale producers. These developments have led the poultry industry and the associated feed industry to scale up rapidly, to concentrate themselves close to input sources or final markets, and to integrate vertically. One element of the structural change has been a move towards contract farming in the rearing phase of boiler production, allowing farmers with medium-sized flocks to gain access to advanced technology with a relatively low initial investment. A clear division is de veloping between industrialized production systems of large and medium size, feeding into integrated value chains, and extensive production systems supporting livelihoods and supplying local or niche markets. The primary role of the former is to supply cheap and safe food to populations distant from the source of supply, while the latter acts as a livelihood safety net, often as part of a diverse portfolio of income sources. Extensive small-scale, rural, family-based poultry systems continue to play a crucial role in sustaining livelihoods in developing countries, supplying poultry products in rural but also periurban and urban areas, and providing important support to women farmers. Small-scale poultry production will continue to offer opportunities for income generation and quality human nutrition as long as there is rural poverty. In order to develop appropriate strategies and options for poultry sector development, including disease prevention control measures, a better understandi ng is required of the different poultry production systems, their associated market chains, and the position of poultry within human societies. This review for Nepal is part of a series of Country Reviews commissioned by the Animal Production and Health Division (AGA). It is intended as a resource document for those seeking information about the poultry sector at a national level, and is not exhaustive. The statistical data that are included from FAOSTAT are partly unofficial data or FAO estimat ed data. For details the reader is advised to consult the official FAOSTAT database at http://faostat.fao.org/. Some topics of the review are only partially covered or not covered at all and this document is subject to ongoing updating. The author and FAO/AGA1 welcome your contributions and feedback.
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    Document
    Review of the legislative framework and jurisprudence concerning the right to adequate food in Nepal 2014
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    The Review of the legislative framework and jurisprudence concerning the right to adequate food in Nepal discusses overarching aspects of Nepalese law and jurisprudence dealing with the human right to food. Following a brief discussion of the international legal protection of the right to food in Nepal, the review, in particular provides a critical assessment of constitutional as well as legislative provisions and offers a thorough analysis of Supreme Court jurisprudence pertaining to the right to food. In addition to judicial remedy, the review also covers non-judicial means of remedy against the violation of food rights. This review comes at an opportune moment in the sense that Nepal's constitution-making process is yet to be completed and there are also a number of ongoing legislative and policy initiatives towards protection and promotion of the right to food. This review provides detailed knowledge to concerned stakeholders on normative and implementation gaps in relation to the right to adequate food. With the view of assisting Nepal in this process, the review also offers a set of concrete recommendations, touching upon a wide range of aspects of the human right to adequate food. This work was undertaken under the global project entitled "Integrating the Right to Adequate Food and Good Governance in National Policies, Legislation and Institutions” (GCP/GLO/324/NOR Right to Food at Country Level) run by the Right to Food Team of the FAO. The project aims to address c ountry challenges by promoting human rights-based approach in efforts to achieve food security at all levels, in legislation, policy and programme design and formulation, decision and implementation. By producing this analysis, FAO aims to assist the Government of Nepal, the Constituent Assembly, the Judiciary, the National Human Rights Institutions, and civil society organizations in their initiatives towards advancing the human right to adequate food.
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    Document
    Public sector support for inclusive agribusiness development – An appraisal of institutional models in Nepal
    Country case studies – Asia
    2014
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    The agrifood system is changing rapidly in response to agricultural modernization and shifting consumer and societal demands for safer, better-quality and more convenient food. This new scenario coexists with more traditional types of family and subsistence farming. This changing environment places increased pressure on Ministries of Agriculture (MOAs) in developing countries to engage in agribusiness and agro-industry development. For this reason, over the past decade, many MOAs have establishe d agribusiness units with technical, policy and coordination functions. To perform well, these units should be given clear mandates and sufficient financial resources and qualified staff familiar with current agribusiness developments, such as value chain programmes, climate-smart agriculture, contract farming and public–private partnerships. However, this ideal scenario rarely occurs. A change in the mind-set of MOA staff is required to move beyond the traditional focus on production towards a more holistic, farm-to-fork approach that includes post-production issues; and this might prove to be quite a challenge. To shed light on the role, performance and empowerment of these agribusiness units, FAO conducted a scoping survey of 71 countries and in-depth analyses of 21 case studies from Africa, Asia and Latin America. The primary objective was to draw lessons that can provide guidance to member countries on how to establish and operate well-performing agribusiness units. The outcome is presented in this series of country case studies, which contribute to enriching knowledge and sharing information on institutional responses for enhancing the public commitment to inclusive agribusiness and agro-industrial growth and job creation.

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