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Safeguarding livelihoods of desert locust-affected farmers and exploring eco-friendly control methods - OSRO/ETH/007/GER










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    Project
    Safeguarding livelihoods of desert locust-affected farmers and exploring eco-friendly control methods – OSRO/ETH/007/GER 2023
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    In the greater Horn of Africa, the vast majority of the population depends on agriculture for its livelihood. Consecutive years of climatic events have increased households’ exposure to risks with limited recovery between shocks. The upsurge of desert locust populations starting in 2019 represented the latest shock to agriculture-dependent households in the region. For communities where food security is already poor and where every gram of food produced counts towards alleviating hunger, the desert locust outbreak presented devastating challenges to food availability. In view of the considerable risk of desert locust damage to the food security of the population in Integrated Food Security Phase Classification (IPC) Phase 3 in Ethiopia, FAO sought to support food production capacities and protect livelihoods of the most vulnerable populations for their respective seasons in desert locust-affected areas of Amhara Region, where communities were already facing food insecurity. This project highlights sheet showcases the activities and impacts of the German-funded project OSRO/ETH/007/GER. This is an ex-ante highlights sheet, and will be followed at project completion by an ex-post highlights sheet, showcasing the project's final results. It is intended to demonstrate FAO's positive impact in response to the desert locust crisis with the potential to generate additional resources.
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    Uganda – Food security and livelihoods in areas affected by desert locusts, September 2020
    Assessment report
    2021
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    This report outlines the results of a household survey carried out in August–September 2020 to assess the impact of desert locust invasions on food security and livelihoods in Uganda. In 2019–2020, the Horn of Africa was affected by what was described by FAO as the worst desert locust infestation in over 25 years. Desert locust swarms pose a severe threat to agriculture-based livelihoods, particularly in areas where food security is already fragile. The first swarm of locusts entered the Ugandan subregion of Karamoja – already the most food-insecure subregion in the country – on 9 February 2020. By September 2020, desert locusts had been sighted in over 20 districts in the Acholi, Elgon, Karamoja, Lango, and Teso subregions. To assess the impact of the desert locust invasions, a survey of 7 800 households was carried out in the affected subregions. Data collection, processing, and analysis were carried out by a technical team comprising staff of the Uganda Bureau of Statistics, the Office of the Prime Minister, the Ministry of Agriculture, Animal Industry and Fisheries, district local governments, Makerere University and FAO; Catholic Relief Services provided support during the collection and validation of the data. The assessment found that the desert locust invasions had had a negative impact on the livelihoods and food security of a majority of households in all surveyed subregions. Based on the results of the assessment, a number of recommendations for response options (including control measures and livelihood support programmes) were formulated. A critical need to improve Uganda’s desert locust preparedness by strengthening the country’s capacities for real-time surveillance, rapid verification and deployment of control teams upon confirmation was highlighted.
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    Emergency Assistance to Desert Locust Monitoring and Control Operations in Kenya - TCP/KEN/3801 2021
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    The Horn of Africa is facing the worst Desert Locust crisis in over 25 years, and the most serious in 70 years for Kenya Desert Locust swarms first appeared in northeast Kenya on 28 December 2019 arriving from adjacent areas of Ethiopia and Somalia to the north The swarms spread rapidly and at an alarming rate Their presence was confirmed in Mandera Wajir Marsabit and Garissa counties, and there were new reports of swarms in Meru and Isiolo counties On 8 January 2020 a very large swarm was reported west of Mandera which was 40 km by 60 km in size It was also starting to mature, suggesting the likelihood of breeding, which would require a hopper band control campaign to be mounted, in addition to a campaign to control the current swarms The swarm invasion and its potential to multiply and spread rapidly to other counties posed an unprecedented threat to food security and livelihoods in the country The occurrence of the pest in northern Kenya caused particular concern, as the agropastoral communities in the region were recovering from a prolonged drought It was therefore critical and urgent to deploy both prevention and control operational mechanisms, to significantly reduce the potential impact of the Desert Locust in the affected areas of the country.

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