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Practical guidelines for the assessment, monitoring and reporting on national level criteria and indicators for sustainable forest management in dry forests in Asia










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    Book (stand-alone)
    Asia-Pacific Forestry Commission: development of national-level criteria and indicators for the sustainable management of dry forests of Asia: workshop report 2000
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    A report of the proceedings of the workshop, which was organized in Bhopal, India from 30 November to 3 December 1999, by FAO, UNEP (UN Environment Programme), ITTO (International Tropical Timber Organization), USDA/FS (United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service) and IIFM (Indian Institute of Forest Management). The main participants were representatives of forestry agencies from nine Asian countries with dry forests - Bangladesh, Bhutan, China, India, Mongolia, Myanmar, Nepal, Sri L anka and Thailand. Besides a summary of the discussions and recommendations, the publication lists the eight national-level criteria agreed on at the meeting. The meeting was held to follow up on the recommendation by the 17th session of the Asia Pacific Forestry Commission (APFC) in 1998 to promote better understanding of forest management-evaluation criteria and indicators as a highly useful tool for the sustainable use of the region's forests.
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    Article
    Criteria and Indicators framework to measure the sustainability of forest resources in India and their contribution to SDGs and GFGs
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
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    With the adoption of sustainable development as Agenda 21 at the Earth Summit (1992), the global community reaffirmed its commitment to sustainable development at the World Summit on Social Development in Copenhagen in 1995, the World Summit on Sustainable Development in Johannesburg in 2002, and at Rio + 20 in 2012. The outcome at Rio+20 was documented as “The Future We Want" into a set of SDGs (Sustainable development Goals) also known as the Agenda 2030 (2012). The efforts were also made to integrate the sustainable development goals into sustainable management of the world’s forests at the United Nations Forum on Forest (UNFF). These efforts fructified into the UN General Assembly in 2017 adopting a set of six Global Forest Goals (GFGs) and 26 associated targets to be achieved by 2030. Considering the Criteria & Indicators as a potent tool, the country’s across the world committed themselves to realize these global goals through the adoption of criteria and indicators’ approach for the management of their forest resources. In this process eleven regional and international initiatives have emerged, one of these is Regional Initiative for Dry Forests in Asia (also known as Bhopal- India Process). India developed its national set of C&I into 8 criteria and 37 indicators. These were then adopted and integrated into its national forest planning process at Forest Management Unit (FMU) level through National Working Plan Code (NWPC) 2014. Following the adoption of NWPC, the country needs to create a system of national monitoring and evaluation. The proposed paper is an attempt to evolve a set of applicable indicators along-with baseline value for periodic assessment. A comparison of the observed values of the identified indicators against the baseline would help understand the change in the forestry conditions and provide a framework for interpretation, measuring, and monitoring the sustainability of forest resources and their contribution to achieving SDGs and GFGs. Keywords: Criteria and indicator, Bhopal-India Process, Sustainable Forest Management ID:3486849
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    Book (stand-alone)
    The second World Food Survey
    Rome, November 1952
    1952
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    One of FAO's first major accomplishments was the World Food Survey, published in 1946. A few months earlier, FAO had been established as the agency through which governments could work together in the task of enabling people of all countries to have enough of the right kinds of food and to enjoy adequate standards of living. There was a general awareness that a large proportion of the world's population was insufficiently and improperly nourished, but the facts and figures needed to measure the size of the problem had never been systematically assembled. No broad statistical picture or map existed which could serve as a guide in the campaign against hunger and malnutrition which the Member States of FAO had pledged themselves to undertake. Much has happened since 1946 and a new assessment, which will indicate what has happened in the postwar period, is now needed. It is also necessary to gauge the progress which has been made towards the objectives set up in the earlier Survey, and the prospects for the future. The Second World Food Survey is presented as a report on progress made thus far, and as a guide to future action. It is incomplete and, in many respects, provisional. But if to some degree it assists national governments, regional and international organizations to formulate plans and programs for more intense and comprehensive action in the future, it will have achieved its purpose.

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