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International mechanisms for the control and responsible use of alien species in aquatic ecosystems. Report of an Ad Hoc Expert Consultation. Xishuangbanna, People's Republic of China, 27-30 August 2003.








Bartley, D.M.; Bhujel, R.C.; Funge-Smith, S.; Olin, P.G.; Phillips, M.J. (eds and comps), 2005. International mechanisms for the control and responsible use of alien species in aquatic ecosystems. Report of an Ad Hoc Expert Consultation. Xishuangbanna, People's Republic of China, 27-30 August 2003. Rome, FAO. 195 pp.


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