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BASELINE REPORT ON NUTRITION AND HEALTH

Bangladesh Food Insecurity and Vulnerability Information and Mapping Systems (FIVIMS)







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    Book (series)
    Enterobacter sakazakii and other microorganisms in powdered infant formula - Meeting report. Microbiological Risk Assessment Series (MRA) 6 2004
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    Microorganisms, and in particular Enterobacter sakazakii, in powdered infant formula are considered to be an emerging public health issue. This issue was recently brought to the attention of the Codex Alimentarius, which has decided to revise its Recommended International Code of Hygienic Practices for Foods for Infants and Children in order to address concerns raised by pathogens that may be present in infant formula. FAO and WHO convened an expert meeting with the objective of providing scien tific advice to facilitate this revision process. This volume reports on the findings of that meeting. E. sakazakii has caused disease in all age groups. Statistics indicate that infants, in particular pre-term, underweight or immunocompromised infants, are at greatest risk. Powdered infant formula is not a sterile product and may occasionally contain pathogens even when it meets the current Codex standards. This report looks at range of control strategies during both manufacture and subsequen t use of powdered infant formula that may be implemented to minimize the risk. This volume and others in this Microbiological Risk Assessment Series contain information that is useful to both risk assessors and risk managers, the Codex Alimentarius Commission, governments and food regulatory agencies, industries, care givers to infants and other people or institutions with an interest in the area of microorganisms in powdered infant formula, their impact on public health and food trade, and p otential control strategies.
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    IMCF Improved Complementary Feeding Practices Newsletter. No. 5, December 2013 2013
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    The fifth issue of the IMCF newsletter on Improved Complementary Feeding presents preliminary results of longitudinal studies which were carried out in Malawi and Cambodia in 2013 to assess the impact of nutrition education for caregivers with children aged 6-18 months on the dietary intake and nutritional status of their children. Also, the influence of grandmothers in promoting cultural infant and young child feeding practices is reported
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    Book (stand-alone)
    Livestock programming for nutritional improvements in children under five years of age and pregnant and lactating mothers
    Baseline report
    2022
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    The Livestock for Health (L4H) project is a collaborative effort between the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF), the Marsabit County Government, the National Government of Kenya, the National Drought Management Authority (NDMA) and Washington State University (WSU). The project was made possible through the support provided by the Office of Technical and Program Quality, Bureau for Humanitarian Assistance, United States Agency for International Development (USAID), to determine the cost-effectiveness of livestock feeding interventions and nutritional counselling in reducing the risk of malnutrition among children and women in pastoral communities during the critical dry periods. The project was designed as a cluster randomized control trial with two intervention arms and one control group. Households in Intervention Arm 1 receive livestock feeds sufficient to maintain two tropical livestock units (TLUs) for 90 days during critical dry periods or drought and 7–14 days into the rain season. Households in Intervention Arm 2 receive similar livestock feeds and regular nutritional counselling carried out by trained community healthcare workers. Households in Arm 3 are the control group and do not receive any of the two interventions during the study period. The results from this baseline survey will be essential for comparing with other data which will be collected during the routine household data collection visits (six week follow-up and quarterly household visits) for monitoring trends in household milk yield, milk consumption (amount and frequency) and nutritional status across the intervention and control arms of the study over the study period. At baseline, both the intervention and control arms were comparable in household demographics, socio-economic characteristics, household livestock ownership, milk production and consumption, and maternal and child nutritional status and health. Additionally, the high prevalence of malnutrition in this study population and the data on health and intervention costs which will be collected in this study will allow for a cost-effectiveness analysis to determine if livestock feeding interventions and nutritional counselling are cost-effective in reducing the risk of malnutrition among children and women in pastoral communities during the critical dry periods.

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