Thumbnail Image

FAO Sub-Regional Office for Eastern Africa (SFE) Conservation Agriculture in Ethiopia

Proceedings of the workshop, 6th July 2010, Addis Ababa







Also available in:
No results found.

Related items

Showing items related by metadata.

  • Thumbnail Image
    Article
    The agroforestry practices in SAARC countries: A critical review
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    Agroforestry, a land use practice that integrates tree and agriculture crops in a given space and time, is a prominent land-use practices in South Asia region. In addition to trees and agriculture component, agroforestry accommodates livestock and non-timber forest products and therefore enhances people’s livelihood at the local level. It has also been claimed that agroforestry practices minimise the effect of climate change, conserve soil and water, sequester atmospheric carbon and provides various ecosystem services. But as concrete evidences are rather scarce. In order to examine the benefits and service functions of agroforestry (production, protection, regulatory and other ecosystem services), a critical review of existing agroforestry related policy and provision from the region was carried out. The review suggests that almost all SAARC countries practice agroforestry as one of the options for immediate use of forestry products while generating additional household income. However, the evidences of intangible agroforestry functions such as regulatory, protection and other ecosystem services aren't duly acknowledged. There are now legal provisions for taking up agroforestry practices. The review suggests that small land holdings (< 0.5 hectares) among the farmers is one of the most hindering factor in developing large scale agroforestry practices in the region. Scale of products obtained from agroforestry practices are not large and are not adequate enough to make desired income. Yet the future of agroforestry in most SAARC countries is bright because of increasing awareness towards agroforestry and its multiple uses including trend of utilizing the tree species for small scale enterprises, and for industrial and commercial use. Keywords: Agroforestry, ecosystem services, SAARC countries, sustainable development goals ID: 3476527
  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (stand-alone)
    Towards Sustainable Management and Development of Tropical Secondary Forests in Anglophone Africa: The Nairobi Proposal for Action 2003
    Also available in:

    Secondary forests - defined as forests which have developed after significant disturbance (see chapter II) - are increasingly prominent features in tropical landscapes, and in many countries the surface area covered by them is far greater than that of primary forests. In Africa there may be as much as 90 million to 313.3 million ha of secondary forest, depending on the definition used. This represents between 6.4 % and 22.3 % of the world's tropical forest. Secondary forests provide a variety of products and services that can contribute to improving socio-economic conditions particularly in rural areas, watershed protection, combating soil run-off and erosion, and commercial timber and NWFP production. If secondary forests are managed well they may - under favourable framework conditions - relieve the pressure on remaining primary forests, thereby effectively conserving biodiversity and genetic resources. More recently, the potential of this resource to sequester carbon from the atmosp here has become an important topic, and is discussed at international fora around the world. In order to realize the potential of secondary forests we need to manage them in a sustainable manner. Unfortunately the management of this resource has received insufficient attention at local, national and international levels. More focus is needed on the socio-economic factors responsible for secondary forest formation, the interactions of secondary forests with other land-use types (farmers' crop and livestock production systems), and the environmental benefits this resource can provide. Particularly the translation to well formulated policies backed by adequate legal regulations and a supportive institutional framework is needed. It is within this context that a series of regional workshops (Tropical America, Asia and Africa) were developed.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Article
    Micropropagation of bamboo in the green pathway to the growth and sustainability: snags and keys
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    The fastest growing plant in the world, bamboo is an ideal investment for ecosystem management. Potentials of the bamboo restoring the degraded lands are already established. This plant can easily colonized in disturbed land because of its adaptability and nutrient conservation ability. This plant can protect steep slopes, soils, water ways, prevents soil erosion, sequester carbon and brings many other ecosystem benefits. The impact of bamboo growth on the soil may be different at their species level and it is expected that there is a large increase in the microbial biomass, particularly, in the rhizosphere zone as they do not provide only a larger root surface area but enhances the soil fertility. Here micropropagation has a great role by producing a huge quantity of propagules with ideal characteristics for specific area. This paper was mentioned about the different constraints related to establish an efficient protocol for bamboo micropropagation and some solutions for them. Key words: Bamboo; Land restoration; micropropagation. ID: 3486685

Users also downloaded

Showing related downloaded files

No results found.