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Support to Sustainable Management of Shea Tree Park Lands in Three Communities in the West Gonja District, Northern Region, Ghana - TCP/GHA/3601









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    Book (stand-alone)
    Shea value chain as key pro-poor carbon-fixing engine in West Africa 2020
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    As part of its Sustainability Program, the Global Shea Alliance (GSA), in partnership with the Food and Agriculture Organisation of the United Nations (FAO Regional Office for Africa), conducted this multi-impact appraisal of the shea value chain in 8 West African countries that account for 99 percent of shea exports. The study uses the EX-ACT Value Chain tool (EX-ACT VC), developed in 2016 by the FAO, to assess the value chain’s contribution to climate mitigation, climate resilience, and socio-economic impact. At present, the shea value chain fixes 1.5 million tons of CO2 every year. Relative to production volumes, every ton of shea kernels produced has a negative carbon footprint of 1.04 tons of CO2. With an expansion strategy supported by donors and private partners to increase shea tree population in agroforestry areas by 7 million additional trees per year, the CO2 fixed could increase up to 9 million tons of CO2e per year, leading to an aggregated carbon fixing impact of 180 million tons of CO2e over 20 years. Through shea parklands expansion and improvement of collector productivity, the gross income per woman collector could increase to USD 127/ year, while the value added per day of work will reach USD 2.30. The global value chain will reach a gross production value of about US$ 593 million, representing 6 percent growth per year between 2019 and 2032 and a value added of USD 452 million by 2032.
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    Shea butter production and marketing efficiency in Kwara State, Nigeria
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
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    The study was conducted to determine the effectiveness of the marketing chain of shea-butter in Kwara State, Nigeria. A multi-stage sampling technique was adopted to select respondents for the study. Data were collected using three different sets of questionnaires administered on producers, wholesalers and retailers of shea-butter. Descriptive statistics, profit analysis, marketing margin and marketing efficiency tools were used for the study. Results show that shea-butter production in the study area is based on the traditional method. Total cost and revenue were highest for the producers compared to wholesalers and retailers (Producers- N31,360.00; N81,150.00, Wholesalers- N23,400.00; N54,550.00, Retailers-N10,300.00; N28,550.00). The wholesalers received the highest net profit (N31,150.00 per week), while the retailers received the lowest (N18,250.00). The rate of return on investment was highest for the producers (28.10), while the lowest was the retailers (16.70). Conversely, the benefit-cost ratio was highest for the retailers (2.77) and lowest for the producers (1.41). Estimates of marketing efficiency showed that efficiency of wholesaler (961.54%) was more than that of the retailer (436.90%). The production and marketing of shea-butter in the study area is profitable with some levels of market efficiency in the trade. Nevertheless, to enhance production of shea-butter in the study area, improved production methods should be adopted. The level of supply of shea nut must also be enhanced by focusing on domestication of the shea tree. Furthermore, there is need for product differentiation through innovative concepts among the wholesalers and retailers so as to increase their share of the gross marketing margin in the trade. Keywords: Value chain, Decent employment, Gender, Sustainable forest management ID: 3475468
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    Book (series)
    The Contribution of Tree Crop Products to Smallholder Households: A case study of Baobab, Shea, and Néré in Burkina Faso 2015
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    This document examines the contrib ution of tree products derived from baobab (Adansonia digitata), shea (Vitellaria paradoxa) and néré (Parkia biglobosa) to smallholder livelihoods where these nontimber forest products form a significant part of the subsistence economies of smallholder households in the Sahelian region. The benefits are access to nutritious foodstuffs particularly during the soudure hunger season and are also commercialised.

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